Links module 1

SECTION 1: Introduction for Training Facilitators

Overview

The ADA and Self-Advocacy for Youth — Train-the-Trainer Curriculum has been developed with a modular design. Using the train-the-trainer model, each module will include multiple components including:

  • PowerPoint slides with presentation content and talking notes.
  • Training facilitator talking points and speaker notes.
  • Videos and other multi-media content (when appropriate)
  • Activities such as role play scenarios, quizzes, and art activities.
  • Relevant resources including targeted documents, organizations, and websites.

The modules are designed to be presented in stand-alone sessions. Shorter or longer sessions may be developed based upon the students’ needs. A menu of interactive exercises will be provided for each module. One or more activities may be selected to reinforce the learning objectives based upon the needs of the facilitator and students.

Training facilitators participate in a train-the-trainer event led by the BBI/SEADA Curriculum Development Team. Training facilitators will also be provided with targeted, relevant materials about hosting an accessible training event, accessible presentation methods, effective utilization of the module materials, and strategies for customizing modules based on audience needs.

 

 

Learning Modules

  • Module 1: Pathways to Careers: An Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Roadmap
  • Module 2: Disclosure Decisions and Talking About My Disability
  • Module 3: The ADA in the Workplace
  • Module 4: The ADA in Higher Education
  • Module 5: Advocating for My Rights Under the ADA
  • Module 6: Skills for Successful Employment
  • Module 7: The ADA and Reasonable Accommodations on the Job
  • Module 8: The ADA in the Community
  • Module 9: The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
  • Module 10: The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Blind or Low Vision
  • Module 11: Interactions with Law Enforcement
  • Module 12: Parent to Partner

Module 1: Pathways to Careers: An Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Roadmap

Module 1: Pathways to Careers: An Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Roadmap provides a basic overview and understanding of the ADA. The module provides a brief description of each section of the ADA and examples of how it might apply. Discussion questions are incorporated throughout the slide presentation. Interactive exercises are provided to reinforce the content from the slide presentation and the video.

The PowerPoint presentation provides a basic overview and understanding of the ADA. Combined with the suggested advance readings that students can access, the initial exercise focuses on understanding freedom, and the post-presentation interactive exercises on ADA rights. The overall goal of this module is to broadly introduce students to the concept of inclusion in society and civil rights for people with disabilities.

In addition, by learning about the different titles of the ADA and the areas they cover, students’ awareness will be raised about the many ways in which the ADA can apply to their daily lives. This should help the students to understand that the law is not an abstract concept that impacts primarily adults in complex circumstances, but rather that it is directly related to making sure they have equal access to participating in their communities, in educational settings, in recreational environments, and in employment the way their peers do. Students should be inspired to learn more about their civil rights and feel a sense of empowerment that will allow them to achieve their goals of advanced education and/or employment.

Learning Objectives

The student will:

  • Gain an understanding of how the ADA guarantees equal access in multiple areas of life.
  • Gain an understanding of how the ADA promotes independence.
  • Be able to discuss the rights that he/she has as a person with a disability.
  • Be able to identify one educational and/or employment goal to pursue.
  • Explore his/her own goals and how the ADA might help the student reach his/her goals.

SECTION 2: Strategies for Customization

Adapting and Making Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

The following resources provide guidance on working with students with a variety of disabilities. The resources provide information about adaptations that can be made to instructional techniques and accommodations that can be provided to increase inclusion in the classroom.

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching
Link: cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/disabilities/

Successful Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities
Source: Learning Disabilities Association of America
Link: ldaamerica.org/successful-strategies-for-teaching-students-with-learning-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/teaching/topics/inclusive-teaching/teaching-students-with-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: University of Rochester
Link: www.rochester.edu/college/teaching/teaching-guidance/students-with-disabilities.html

Etiquette for Working with Students with Disabilities
Source: Best Colleges
Link: www.bestcolleges.com/resources/disability-etiquette/

Students with Disabilities in the College Classroom
Source: HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center
Link: www.heath.gwu.edu/students-disabilities-college-classroom

College for Students with Disabilities: A Guide for Students, Families, and Educators
Source: Maryville University
Link: online.maryville.edu/disabilities-guide/

Tips for Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: The University of Wyoming — University Disability Support Services
Link: www.uwyo.edu/wind/echo  OR  www.uwyo.edu/wind/index.html

Invisible Disabilities and Postsecondary Education
Source: DO IT Center, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/invisible-disabilities-and-postsecondary-education
Related Video – Captioned and Audio Described (18:44 minutes)
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/videos/index.php?vid=36

How to Teach and Accommodate
Source: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Link: www.umassd.edu/dss/resources/faculty-staff/how-to-teach-and-accommodate/

23 Ways to Communicate with a Non-Verbal Child
Source: Special Needs Resources
Link: www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2013/04/16/23-ways-to-communicate-with-a-non-verbal-child/

Instructional Strategies
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies

At a Glance: Classroom Accommodations for Nonverbal Learning Disabilities
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies/at-a-glance-classroom-accommodations-for-nonverbal-learning-disabilities

Customizing the Lesson Using Presentation Material and Interactive Exercises

There are three sets of resources provided that can be woven together to customize the learning experience, depending on your goals as a facilitator for this particular lesson on the basics of the ADA (e.g., providing a very simple introduction versus teaching the basics as a platform for having students engage in deeper learning about complex examples). These include: (1) advance preparation material that students can review; (2) a set of PowerPoint slides that can be used in a presentation and discussion format; and (3) a set of interactive exercises to stimulate applied learning, creativity, and deeper thinking about the concepts.

1.    Advance Preparation Material for Students

This lesson provides a very simple, high-level overview of the ADA and its five titles. The goal is to introduce students to the idea of rights for people with disabilities, their inclusion in society, how the ADA might apply to their lives broadly, and to inspire them to learn more. Suggested resources for advance preparation include readings and videos about the civil rights movements for people of color, and women. These materials will engage students to think about rights for different groups and prepare them for class discussions about how civil rights can apply for people with disabilities. In addition, a brief video prepared for the Rio Paralympics is meant to provide examples of having dreams, goals, and being able to achieve what one wants regardless of disability.

As noted, these materials can be provided in advance to students, or if the class session is long enough, they may be used in class prior to presenting the PowerPoint slides and getting into a specific discussion of the ADA. Alternatively, they could be used as both advance preparation (pre-homework) and repeated in class to reinforce the learning.

2.   PowerPoint Slides

The PowerPoint slides can be used in class to provide an overview of the ADA and the areas of life to which it applies. Combined with the interactive exercises, the presentation can be extended to cover a long class session or multiple smaller class sessions. The slides can also be presented on their own as part of a short lesson on the ADA.

3.   Interactive Exercises

Several interactive exercises are provided to engage the students in considering specific examples that relate to the material on the ADA. For example, while the presentation material explains that the ADA ensures equal access in the community, an interactive exercise leads the students to consider what would happen if they could not get on a bus. Therefore, the exercise provides a concrete lesson on accessible transportation and explains how the ADA is a law that requires that public transportation be accessible. These exercises and examples may reflect actual student experiences. The facilitators can ask students to share these experiences to provide variations on those provided in these materials.

The exercises can be used in different orders, and can be used before, during, or after the PowerPoint presentation. As reviewed below, it is suggested that the interactive exercise regarding consideration of “freedom” be engaged in first, prior to presenting the PowerPoint slides. Though it is presented as an art activity, it can be adapted to be a discussion exercise (“tell me examples of freedom”) or a pre- or post-presentation homework exercise that is essay based. Adapting it from an art exercise to an essay or term paper exercise is also a way of adapting it to students in different grades or of different developmental stages.

SECTION 3: Suggested Advance Preparation for Facilitators

Readings

Fact Sheet: An Overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/ADA-overview

Booklet: The Americans with Disabilities Act Questions and Answers
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/publication/ADA-faq-booklet

Toolkit: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to the Americans with Disabilities Act
The ADA toolkit is available in two versions: 1) Easy Read Edition. The Easy Read version is split into seven parts. Each part has its own Words to Know section, and there is also a separate Words to Know part with all of the terms from every section. 2) A Plain Language Version for either those with vision-related disabilities or those who would prefer a version without accompanying graphics.
Source: Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN)
Link: autisticadvocacy.org/policy/toolkits/ada/

Booklet: Overview of the ADA: The Americans with Disabilities Act [PDF 20 pages]
This easy-to-read booklet is designed for people with intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, or anyone else who would like a short, simple overview of the ADA.
Source: Mid-Atlantic ADA Center
Link: www.adainfo.org/sites/default/files/ADA-Overview-Easy-Read.pdf

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/guide/ada-national-network-disability-law-handbook

Web Course

Foundations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Web Course
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link: bit.ly/foundations-ada-course
The ADA Foundations (bit.ly/foundations-ada-course) is a comprehensive web course designed to increase your knowledge and understanding of the core concepts about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). The web course has been developed to help you learn about the important concepts of the ADA and to think about inclusive solutions for people with disabilities in the workplace, state and local government programs, and private businesses.

Learning Objectives of ADA Foundations web course
Upon completion of this web course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the ADA using a civil rights framework.
  • Identify the five titles of the ADA.
  • Provide a basic overview of each title of the ADA.
  • Define the general nondiscrimination requirements of the ADA.
  • Explain each nondiscrimination requirement using 1-2 real-life examples.
  • Identify the defenses or limitations of each nondiscrimination requirement.
  • Identify the federal agencies responsible for enforcing each title of the ADA.
  • Locate and use resources for information on the ADA.

 

SECTION 4: Suggested Advance Preparation for Students

The following advanced reading assignments and video excerpts can be assigned to students to prepare them for learning about the ADA. They review the history of the civil rights movement for people of color as well as women’s history and the fight for women’s rights. The last video, which can also be presented at the start of the class (in addition to, or instead of, being an advance assignment) demonstrates people with disabilities engaged in various activities. These assignments are meant to guide the discussion of the ADA within a context of “equal rights” for all individuals, inspire students to understand how they have rights, and demonstrate how the ADA can be a tool to facilitate those rights.

Readings

Booklet: Overview of the ADA: The Americans with Disabilities Act [PDF 20 pages]
This easy-to-read booklet is designed for people with intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, or anyone else who would like a short, simple overview of the ADA.
Source: Mid-Atlantic ADA Center
Link: www.adainfo.org/sites/default/files/ADA-Overview-Easy-Read.pdf

Fact Sheet: An Overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/ADA-overview

Booklet: The Americans with Disabilities Act Questions and Answers
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/publication/ADA-faq-booklet

Toolkit: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to the Americans with Disabilities Act
The ADA toolkit is available in two versions: 1) Easy Read Edition. The Easy Read version is split into seven parts. Each part has its own Words to Know section, and there is also a separate Words to Know part with all of the terms from every section. 2) A Plain Language Version for either those with vision-related disabilities or those who would prefer a version without accompanying graphics.
Source: Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN)
Link: autisticadvocacy.org/policy/toolkits/ada/

History of the Civil Rights Movement
Source: History.com
Link: www.history.com/topics/black-history/civil-rights-movement
For a longer list of resources regarding the Civil Rights Movement, see:

Civil Rights Movement
Source:
Ed Tech Teacher Best of History Websites
Link: besthistorysites.net/american-history/civil-rights/

Women’s Rights Movement
Source: National Women’s History Project
Link: nationalwomenshistoryalliance.org/resources/womens-rights-movement/

Videos

Video: People with Disabilities Engaged in Various Activities for the Rio Paralympics

Source: Yes I Can!
Link: youtu.be/IocLkk3aYlk

Video: Who Are The Hero’s? History of the Disability Rights Movement
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=EU10zx4Rv5Q

Video – Overview of the ADA
Source: ADA National Network and New England ADA Center

Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ns7UY8HdPr8 (6:41 minutes)

Video: ADA Signing Ceremony (22 minutes)
Source:
U.S. Department of Justice
Link:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gsGiszvyjQ

 

 

SECTION 5: Presentation

Pre-Module for the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: For this module, you may use the PowerPoint slides or the Video – Overview of the ADA. If you have time, you may choose to use the PowerPoint and video together. The video can also be used as homework for students. Section 7: Learning Activities are also provided to reinforce the learning objectives based upon the needs of the facilitator and students. A menu of activities has been provided. You may choose the activities based upon the time that you have to present the material.

Prior to the presentation with the PowerPoint slides, it is suggested that you start by engaging in Activity #2: Art Projects & Musical Expression Activity. This exercise will engage students and help them to think about rights in a creative and broadly framed way, inspiring them to learn more about civil rights for people with disabilities and the ADA.

Proceed next to the video the students viewed in preparation for class. We’re The Superhumans | Rio Paralympics 2016 (youtu.be/IocLkk3aYlk)

Ask the Question: What do you think about the video? Did you realize that people with disabilities can do all the things that people in the video are doing? Fill in the rest of the sentence “Yes, I can______________.” List these objectives as goals on the blackboard to return to later in the discussion.

Ask the Question: How many of you have heard of the Americans with Disabilities Act? (Note how many reply “yes” out of total number in your group.) If anyone in your group indicates a familiarity with the ADA, proceed as follows:

Ask a Follow Up Question: For those of you who have heard of the Americans with Disabilities Act, would you like to share one thing you know about it? (Note these responses.)

Today we are going to learn about the Americans with Disabilities Act (also known as the ADA) and how it can help us in our lives.

Facilitator Note
Use the Module 1 PowerPoint slides, Pathways to Careers…An Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Road Map, or

VideoOverview of the ADA
Source: A Product of the ADA National Network and New England ADA Center
Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ns7UY8HdPr8 (6:41 minutes)

Module 1 PowerPoint slides, Pathways to Careers…An Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Road Map

Slide 1 – Pathways to Careers….An Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Road Map

Slide 1 Notes – Pathways to Careers….An Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Road Map

Objective: The student will be introduced to the topic “What is the ADA?”

Facilitator Talking Points:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is an important civil rights law that guarantees equal treatment for all people with disabilities.

People often are confused about what the ADA means.

We will learn about the major parts of the ADA and how it helps people to have equal opportunities.

The ADA is a law for all of us.

Slide 2 – What is the ADA?

Slide 2 Notes – What is the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)?

Objective: The student will learn how the ADA guarantees equal access.

Facilitator Talking Points:

The ADA can help you with your job.

The ADA lets you have the same opportunity to enjoy programs offered by your local government.

The ADA makes it easier for you to shop, eat at a restaurant, and go to concerts.

The ADA helps keep us safe and allows us to talk with our friends. For people who have difficulty speaking or hearing, the ADA allows for:

  • Special telephone equipment called a TTY that lets people type messages back and forth like sending a text message.
  • A relay service allows people to talk with people who do not have special telephone equipment by relying on a third person to talk or hear for them.

The ADA makes sure that people who use special devices to communicate have equal and direct access to 911 emergency services.

Can you think of examples of ADA accessibility? The examples below can facilitate discussion.

  • A person who is blind or doesn’t see well.
    Example: Signs must have words that are large enough to be seen and have a special font. Signs must have Braille.
  • A person who uses a wheelchair.
    Example: Seating areas and parking places must be accessible at sports venues and movie theaters.
  • A person who is Deaf or hard of hearing.
    Example: Sign language interpreters can be provided. CART (real time transcription) can be provided.
  • A person who has an intellectual disability.
    Example: Tasks are broken down so they can be accomplished in parts. Color coding may be used for people who cannot read. Instructions can be simplified.
  • A person who uses a service animal.
    Example: Businesses must allow service animals in their stores, restaurants, or other places open to the public.

 

 

Slide 3 – The ADA and Working

Slide 3 Notes – The ADA and Working

Objective: The student will be introduced to how the ADA can ensure equal access at work.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Employers often make automatic assumptions about what someone with a disability can and cannot do.

These automatic assumptions and lowered expectations have led to significant discrimination against people with disabilities in the workplace. Title I of the ADA was intended to provide equal opportunity so that people with disabilities, like anyone else, could succeed as far as their talents and drive would take them.

The ADA protects someone in all areas of getting a job. This includes:

  • Job applications;
  • Interviews;
  • Testing;
  • Employment offers;
  • Training;
  • Pay raises; and
  • Doing your job well.

The ADA only provides an equal opportunity. It does not mean that you get chosen for a job just because you have a disability.

Discussion: If you have a job, what are some things that would allow you to do your job better?

Slide 4 – Government Services

Slide 4 Notes – Government Services

Objective: The student will understand how the ADA ensures equal access in the community.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Our country is founded on the belief that everybody should be treated equally. What if you couldn’t use your local park? What if there was something going on in your community and you wanted an elected official to do something about it? Then you found that you couldn’t get into city hall to attend a council meeting to understand what was going on. The ADA helps you to get help from your government and enjoy the programs your government provides.

There may be many things you may not know the ADA can help you with such as:

  • Enjoying a picnic in the park
    Accessible paths
    Signs with Braille or raised lettering.
  • Using a public swimming pool
    Swimming pool lifts or transfer walls
  • Participating in government
    Captioning services
    Interpreters
    Large print or Braille agendas
  • Voting
    Accessible poll locations
    Fair and private accessible voting booths

You can’t be denied access to government services or programs if you use a service animal.

Governments must make every effort to have equal opportunity for people with disabilities to enjoy programs and services. Sometimes this may include separate programs.

Can you name some services your local government provides?
Example: Museums may offer special tours for people who are blind to allow them to touch certain objects. A parks program may offer a separate basketball league for wheelchair users.

Communities with public transportation services must offer “paratransit” services. They serve those with disabilities who cannot use the mainline service of buses or trains. Paratransit offers door to door service for those who use wheelchairs, for those who cannot understand mainline transportation schedules, and for those who cannot get to a station or bus stop due to blindness.

 

 

Slide 5 – Private Businesses

Slide 5 Notes – Private Businesses

Objective: The student will understand how the ADA ensures equal access in order to be independent in his/her community.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Have you ever thought about how many businesses there are in America? There are over five million stores, restaurants, hotels, malls, movie theaters and more that people use every day. The third part of the ADA covers places that people use every day to buy things, be entertained, or to receive a service.

Some examples include:

  • Stores have accessible aisles so wheelchair users can get through the store.
  • Bathrooms are accessible.
  • There are accessible parking spaces for people with limited mobility.
  • Hotels and motels must have some accessible rooms that have fire alarms that have strobe lights for people who cannot hear an alarm.
  • Service animals should always be allowed in places of public accommodation.
    • People who are blind need service dogs to guide them.
    • People who have hearing impairments may need a dog to alert them to sounds.
    • People who have seizures may need a service dog to alert them they are about to have a seizure.

Discussion: Think about places you go every day. What are some things you notice that make a business accessible to you?

 

 

 

Slide 6 – Telephones, Relay Service, and Other Communication Methods

Slide 6 Notes – Telecommunications (Telephones, Relay Service, and Other Communication Methods)

Objective: The student will understand how the ADA allows us to communicate and be safe.

Facilitator Talking Points:

In your lifetime, we have experienced amazing changes that have affected the way we communicate. Just a few years ago people could only use phones to make voice calls. It has only been in the last ten years or so that we have been able to send text messages from our phone. Today, we take it for granted that we can send a text message to someone anytime we want.

Sometimes only a phone conversation will do. If you have difficulty speaking or hearing, the fourth part of the ADA can help you.

  • Relay services allow someone who does not hear or speak to communicate with someone who does by using a third person to carry on the conversation. Here is a list of services provided by Federal Communications Telecommunications Relay Service (www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/telecommunications-relay-service-trs).
  • TY (Text Telephone) – A standard telephone with a typewriter-style keyboard, screen and printer for people who are deaf, hard of hearing or have difficulty speaking.
  • Voice Carry-Over (VCO) – For those who can speak clearly yet have hearing loss significant enough to keep them from understanding what is being said over a standard telephone.
  • Hearing Carry-Over (HCO) – For people with significant speech difficulties who can hear what is being said over the phone.
  • Speech-To-Speech (STS) – For people with mild-to-moderate speech difficulties who can hear what is being said over the phone.
  • Video Relay Service (VRS) – Makes it possible for sign language users to communicate in their native language via video conferencing.
  • CapTel® – Uses voice recognition software to display every word the caller says.
  • Spanish Relay – For Spanish-speaking Relay users.
  • Customer Profile – Create a personal profile that lets the Relay Communications Assistant (CA) automatically know your communications preferences.
  • Voice Users – Learn how easy it is to communicate by phone with Relay users.
  • Additional Features – Including ASCII, voicemail retrieval and more.

In another important feature, if someone needs emergency help, the ADA makes sure they can get it from 911.

 

 

Slide 7– How Can the ADA Help You?

Slide 7 Notes – How Can the ADA Help You?

See interactive exercises.

 

 

Post Module for the Training Facilitator:

Post-Module Facilitator Note: After you have completed the PowerPoint and/or video and learning activities, summarize the session(s) with the group.

Facilitator Question: Now that we have talked about our rights under the ADA, let’s go around and name one way the ADA will help you in your daily life. What did you learn about your rights under the ADA?

List responses on a flip chart or white board, or a word cloud in front of the group and record the number of additional times that each response is given.

For example, if one student says, “I need an accessible bus to go to the grocery store” and others say, “Yeah, me too,” explain that you are putting a number 4 by that response since 4 students said it is important for them.

 

 

SECTION 6: Learning Activities

For the Training Facilitator:

Learning activities have been designed to reinforce the content from the PowerPoint presentation and/or videos. A menu of activities has been provided. You may choose one or more activities based upon the time that you have to present the material and upon the needs of the students. For each interactive activity, suggested time frames are included with each activity. Please keep in mind the age of your students, their individual skill levels, and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group.

Activity #1: Group Discussion

Facilitator Note: Please allow time frames for these discussions and activities that are appropriate for the size of the group and the makeup of the group. Please be flexible if the discussion or the sharing is productive, and the participants are actively engaged.

Activity 1A: “Were Their Rights Denied?”

Time: 5–10 minutes
Facilitator Script
: Sometimes, as a person with a disability, something happens and we feel like our rights have been denied. Sometimes, that is exactly what has happened. At times, though, we just don’t like what has happened to us, and we are unhappy or upset, but our rights as a person with a disability really were not denied.

Example #1 Billy
Billy uses a manual wheelchair. He uses the public bus to get to his part-time job. On Monday, he was waiting at the bus stop with several other bus riders. When the bus arrived, the other riders boarded the bus using the steps in front. The driver then told Billy that the wheelchair lift was broken and he would have to wait for another bus. Then, the bus left. Billy had to wait for the next bus and was late to work on Monday.

Example #1 Facilitator Question 1: What do you think happened to Billy?

Example #1 Facilitator Question 2: Were his rights as a person with a disability denied?

Example #1 Facilitator Note: For example, if your group needs a prompt or guidance, ask, “What do you think about Billy not being able to get on the bus?” or “Do you think the bus driver should have done something for Billy instead of just driving away and leaving him at the bus stop?”

Also, you might ask, “How do you think you would feel if you were Billy?”

Finally, ask the question again, “Do you think Billy’s rights as a person with a disability were denied?”

Example #1 Facilitator Summary: The ADA states that “equipment and facilities such as lifts, ramps, securement devices (straps for securing wheelchairs on board), signage, and communication devices must be in good operating condition. If a feature is out of order, it must be repaired promptly. In the interim, an alternative accessible vehicle or option must be available.”
Source: The ADA & Accessible Ground Transportation
Link: adata.org/factsheet/ADA-accessible-transportation

In Billy’s situation, his rights were violated because the lift was broken and an alternative was not provided to him.

 

 

Example #2 Maria
Maria is a person with autism who loves soccer and team sports activities. Maria tried out for the advanced soccer team at her local recreation center at the city park. Maria was told by the staff at the recreation center that she did not make the advanced soccer team because her soccer skill level was not high enough right now. Maria was very disappointed that she did not make the team.

Example #2 Facilitator Question 1: What do you think happened to Maria?

Example #2 Facilitator Question 2: Were her rights as a person with a disability denied?

Example #2 Facilitator Note: For example, if your group needs a prompt or guidance, ask, “Do you think that someone without a disability might also not make the soccer team because their skill level was not high enough right now?”

You might also ask, “What do you think Maria might do to prepare to try out again in the future?”

Finally, ask the question again, “Do you think Maria’s rights as a person with a disability were denied?”

Example #2 Facilitator Summary: The part of the ADA that applies to state and local government programs prohibits discrimination against any “qualified individual with a disability.” To be qualified, the individual with a disability must meet the essential eligibility requirements to participate in the local government’s programs, activities, or services with or without reasonable modifications to a public entity’s rules, policies, or practices; removal of architectural, communication, or transportation barriers; or provision of auxiliary aids and services.
Source: The Americans with Disabilities Act Title II Technical Assistance Manual – Covering State and Local Government Programs and Services
Link: www.ada.gov/taman2.html

In Maria’s situation, she may not have met the requirements for the advanced soccer league. For example, the advanced soccer league may have a requirement that a person has played for a minimum of three seasons to be in the advanced league. Maria may have only played for one season. The recreation center staff’s denial was based on Maria’s lack of experience not on her disability. Therefore, it was not discrimination under the ADA.

Activity 1B: “Were My Rights Denied?”

Time: 5–10 minutes
Facilitator Script
: With your partner (or in a small group of 3 or 4), share one thing that has happened to you that you think was a time when your rights as a person with a disability were denied. Take turns sharing in your group. Have the group decide if they think that this was a time when your rights were denied, or if it was a time when what happened made you unhappy or upset, but your rights were not denied.

After each person in your group has had a turn to share about one thing that has happened to them, decide as a group on one example to share with the whole group when we come back together. This could be an example of when a person’s rights were denied, or it could be an example that your group decided was a time when someone was unhappy or upset about what happened, but it did not involve having the person’s rights denied.

Facilitator Note: Please allow time frames for these discussions and activities that are appropriate for the size of the group and the nature of the makeup of the group. Please be flexible if the discussion or the sharing is productive, and the participants are actively engaged.

 

Activity #2: Art Projects & Musical Expression

Art Project

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by art activities, such as drawing, painting, collages, murals, etc., you might use art materials to do the following. Please keep in mind the age of your students as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group. If members of your group have difficulty manipulating art materials, such as students who have difficulty using scissors due to limited hand dexterity, consider working in partners or small groups.

If your group is made up of students with varying levels of vision loss, consider having students with low vision work as partners or in small groups with students with total vision loss. Using materials such as magazines, advertising flyers, brochures, pamphlets, etc., have the students with low vision audio describe the pictures and words that the partners or small groups might decide to use in a collage or mural.

If your group is made up of students with total vision loss, consider using the Musical Expression activity with your group.

Activity 2A – Art Activity: “ADA for All”

Time: 15 minutes or more
Facilitator Question
: What do you think of when you hear the word (use any one word or more of the following) – Independence? – Freedom? – Equality? – Access?

Facilitator Script: Using the art materials, draw a picture (or make a painting, collage, mural, etc.) of what you think of when you hear the word {Independence? – Freedom? – Equality? – Access?}.

Facilitator Note: Following the work time, state, “Let’s share our artwork and share what it means to you.” Allow time for students to share about his/her artwork and the meaning of the chosen word. After discussion, explain that this is the reason the ADA was passed – to provide access and inclusion for everyone.

Musical Expression

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by musical expression, you might want to use activities such as singing, simple musical instruments, percussion instruments, drumming, etc. The activity of drumming can be done using plastic buckets or containers or using hands on tabletops. Please keep in mind the age of your students as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group.

Activity 2B  -Musical Expression: “ADA for All”

Time: 15 minutes or more
Facilitator Script: Today we are going to create musical messages.  What do you think of when you hear the word (use any one word or more of the following) – Independence? – Freedom? – Equality? – Access?  Using singing, (or musical instruments, drumming, etc.), create a message of what that word means to you.

Facilitator Note: Following the worktime, allow the students to share their musical messages about the word each one chose. After each student has had a chance to share a musical message, explain that this is the reason the ADA was passed – to provide access and inclusion for everyone.

Activity #3 Dramatic Arts

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by dramatic arts, such as role plays, skits, improvisation, etc., you may choose to use dramatic arts activities.

Activity 3A: “My Rights Were Denied”

Time: 5–10 minutes.

Facilitator Script: Can you think of a time when your rights as a person with a disability were denied? With your partner (or in a small group of 3 or 4), create a (role play, skit, improvisation, etc.), to show a time when your rights as a person with a disability were denied. When I call time’s up, let’s get back together and share with the whole group.

 

Activity 3B: “My Rights Were Respected”

Time: 5–10 minutes.

Facilitator Script: Can you think of a time when your rights as a person with a disability were respected? With your partner (or in a small group of 3 or 4), create a (role play, skit, improvisation, etc.), to show a time when your rights as a person with a disability were respected. When I call time’s up, let’s get back together and share with the whole group.

Activity 3C: “It’s My Right!”

Time: 5–10 minutes.

Facilitator Script: What one right under the ADA is really important to you? Create a short skit about how important that right is to you. If you need other people in your skit, feel free to include members of the group as needed. When I call time’s up, let’s get back together and share with the whole group.

 

 

Activity #4 Role Models

Facilitator Note: For young people with disabilities, it is very important to identify with role models who are people with disabilities living independently in the community. Sources for finding role models that may serve as guest speakers in class include:

Activity 4A: Virtual Reality—”And Now, A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5–15 minutes
Facilitator Note
: Invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 – 4 people with disabilities to briefly share about a time when each one had to advocate for their rights under the ADA. Then allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

Activity 4B: Virtual Reality—”A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5–15 minutes
Facilitator Note
: Using Zoom or a similar platform, invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 to 4 people with disabilities to briefly share about a time when each one had to advocate for their rights under the ADA. Then, allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

SECTION 7: Handouts or Materials Needed

  • Audiovisual equipment for PowerPoint presentation and/or videos.
  • Art materials, blank paper, colored pencils or markers.
  • Photocopies of PowerPoint slides, including alternate formats such as large print, Braille, and electronic formats such as a USB drive for students with visual or print disabilities.

SECTION 8: After Class

Homework Possibilities

Visit 3-5 different places in your community (e.g., a bank, restaurant, public library, park, and a store). In each location, identify accommodations that have been made for people of different disabilities or barriers preventing access (e.g., only having steps to get into the building). During the next class session, present the list of places visited and the accommodations or barriers that were observed.

Quiz Questions

Use these quiz questions to reinforce learning by giving this pop quiz at the end of class, as a homework assignment, or at the beginning of the next class session. Correct answers are noted with an asterisk (*).

  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act is a law that can help me be treated equally.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act lets me be picked for a job over other people.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act helps me be a part of my community.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act allows people who use wheelchairs to have equality when they use the bus system.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act protects me when applying for a job and during a job interview.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act helps people to use stores, restaurants, gyms, and other private businesses.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. A relay service is a way for people who are Deaf or who have speech disabilities to communicate via the phone.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. If I am Deaf and need a sign language interpreter, I need to hire one myself to participate in local government events.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act has rules for public transportation.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. The Americans with Disabilities Act is a civil rights law.
  • Yes*
  • No

 

 

SECTION 9: Resources for Students

Additional Reading and Videos

Fact Sheet: An Overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/ADA-overview

Video – Overview of the ADA
Source: ADA National Network and New England ADA Center

Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ns7UY8HdPr8 (6:41 minutes)

Video: ADA Signing Ceremony (22 minutes)
Source:
U.S. Department of Justice
Link:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gsGiszvyjQ

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/guide/ada-national-network-disability-law-handbook

Americans with Disabilities Act Information Center

ADA National Network

Phone: 1-800-949-4232 (toll free)

Website: adata.org

Facebook: facebook.com/adanetwork

Twitter: twitter.com/ADANational

National Resources

Community Organizations

The Association of Programs for Rural Independent Living (APRIL)
Link: www.april-rural.org/index

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