Links Module 9

SECTION 2: Strategies for Customization

Adapting and Making Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

The following resources provide guidance on working with students with a variety of disabilities. The resources provide information about adaptations that can be made to instructional techniques and accommodations that can be provided to increase inclusion in the classroom.

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching
Link: cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/disabilities/

Successful Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities
Source: Learning Disabilities Association of America
Link: ldaamerica.org/successful-strategies-for-teaching-students-with-learning-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/teaching/topics/inclusive-teaching/teaching-students-with-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: University of Rochester
Link: www.rochester.edu/college/teaching/teaching-guidance/students-with-disabilities.html

Etiquette for Working with Students with Disabilities
Source: Best Colleges
Link: www.bestcolleges.com/resources/disability-etiquette/

Students with Disabilities in the College Classroom
Source: HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center
Link: www.heath.gwu.edu/students-disabilities-college-classroom

College for Students with Disabilities: A Guide for Students, Families, and Educators
Source: Maryville University
Link: online.maryville.edu/disabilities-guide/

Tips for Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: The University of Wyoming — University Disability Support Services
Link: www.uwyo.edu/wind/echo OR www.uwyo.edu/wind/index.html

Invisible Disabilities and Postsecondary Education
Source: DO IT Center, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/invisible-disabilities-and-postsecondary-education
Related Video – Captioned and Audio Described (18:44 minutes)
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/videos/index.php?vid=36

How to Teach and Accommodate
Source: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Link: www.umassd.edu/dss/resources/faculty-staff/how-to-teach-and-accommodate/

23 Ways to Communicate with a Non-Verbal Child
Source: Special Needs Resources
Link: www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2013/04/16/23-ways-to-communicate-with-a-non-verbal-child/

Instructional Strategies
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies

At a Glance: Classroom Accommodations for Nonverbal Learning Disabilities
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies/at-a-glance-classroom-accommodations-for-nonverbal-learning-disabilities

Customizing the Lesson Using Presentation Material and Interactive Exercises

There are three sets of resources provided that can be woven together to customize the learning experience, depending on your goals as a facilitator for this lesson on The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (e.g., providing a very simple introduction versus teaching the basics as a platform for having students engage in deeper learning about complex examples). These include: (1) advance preparation material that students can review; (2) a set of PowerPoint slides that can be used in a presentation and discussion format; and (3) a set of interactive exercises to stimulate applied learning, creativity, and deeper thinking about the concepts.

1.             Advance Preparation Material for Students

This lesson provides a very simple, high-level overview of The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. The goal is to introduce students to the idea of the terms “effective communication” and “auxiliary aids and services start students thinking about ways that provide equal access to information and communications in our environment Suggested resources for advance preparation include readings and videos of self-advocacy.

As noted, these materials can be provided in advance to students, or if the class session is long enough, they may be used in class prior to presenting the PowerPoint slides and getting into a specific discussion of the ADA. Alternatively, they could be used as both advance preparation (pre-homework) and repeated in class to reinforce the learning.

2.            PowerPoint Slides

The PowerPoint slides can be used in class to provide a more in-depth overview of: The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. Combined with the interactive exercises, the presentation can be extended to cover a long class session or multiple smaller class sessions. The slides can also be presented on their own as part of a short lesson on Advocating for My Rights Under the ADA”.

3.            Interactive Exercises

Several interactive exercises are provided to engage the students in considering specific examples that relate to the material “: The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.” For example, while the presentation material explains effective communication and auxiliary aids and services for individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing, and includes: methods of effective communication in public places, asking for accommodations, the rights of requesting an accommodation, and the public accommodation’s requirement to provide effective communication responsibilities of why it is important. an interactive exercise leads the students to practice how to request accommodations (see interactive exercise #1). Therefore, the exercise provides a concrete lesson on the accommodation process and explains how the ADA is a law that applies to public places.

 

 

SECTION 3: Suggested Advance Preparation for Facilitators

Readings

Facts About the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Link: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/fs-ada.cfm

Revised ADA Requirements: Effective Communication | PDF
Source: Department of Justice
Link: ada.gov/effective-comm

Effective Communication: ADA Title II & III – Fact Sheet Series
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/communication

General Effective Communication Requirements Under Title II of the ADA
Source: ADA Best Practices Tool Kit for State and Local Governments
Link: ada.gov/pcatoolkit/chap3toolkit.htm

What kinds of auxiliary aids and services are required by the ADA to ensure effective communication with individuals with hearing or vision impairments?
Source: ADA National Network FAQs
Link: adata.org/faq/what-kinds-auxiliary-aids-and-services-are-required-ada-ensure-effective-communication

ADA Center News on New ADA Regulations on Effective Communication
Source: Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons
Link: www.ada.gov/resources/effective-communication/

ADA Effective Communication – Title III in American Sign Language (ASL)
Source: Disability and Communication Access Board (Honolulu)- YouTube Video
Link: youtube.com/watch?v=OdJ6WOeU61Q

Communicating with People Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: ADA Guide for Law Enforcement Officers
Source: U.S. Department of Justice – Civil Rights Division
Link: ada.gov/lawenfcomm.htm

Questions and Answers for Health Care Providers
Source: National Association of the Deaf
Link: nad.org/issues/health-care/providers/questions-and-answers

Communicating with People Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing in Hospital Settings: ADA Business Brief
Source: U.S. Department of Justice – Civil Rights Division
Link: ada.gov/hospcombr.htm

Accommodation Examples
Source: Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/soar/hearing/hearingex.html

Employees with Hearing Loss
Source: Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/media/downloads/HearingA&CSeries.pdf

ADA Live Episode 4: Effective Communication
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-4/

Auxiliary Aids and Services for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities
Source: U.S. Department of Education
Link: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

Workbook

The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/publications/the-411-on-disability-disclosure-a-workbook-for-youth-with-disabilities/

Websites

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Search for ADA information by topic or type of disability.
Link: www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm

Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Search for information on job accommodations.
Link: askjan.org/media/index.htm

History of Gallaudet
Source: Gallaudet University
Link: www.gallaudet.edu/academic-catalog/about-gallaudet/history-of-gallaudet

The Week of Deaf President Now
Source: Gallaudet University
Link: www.gallaudet.edu/about/history-and-traditions/deaf-president-now/the-issues/the-week-of-dpn

Media

Disability Inclusion Starts with You (Captioned)
Source: Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP)
Link: www.dol.gov/ofccp/SelfIdVideo.html

Web Courses

Foundations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Web Course (Southeast ADA Center)

Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link:
bit.ly/foundations-ada-course

The ADA Foundations (bit.ly/foundations-ada-course) is a comprehensive web course designed to increase your knowledge and understanding of the core concepts about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). The web course has been developed to help you learn about the important concepts of the ADA and to think about inclusive solutions for people with disabilities in the workplace, state and local government programs, and private businesses.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this web course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the ADA using a civil rights framework.
  • Identify the five titles of the ADA.
  • Provide a basic overview of each title of the ADA.
  • Define the general nondiscrimination requirements of the ADA.
  • Explain each nondiscrimination requirement using 1-2 real-life examples.
  • Identify the defenses or limitations of each nondiscrimination requirement.
  • Identify the federal agencies responsible for enforcing each title of the ADA.
  • Locate and use resources for information on the ADA.

 

SECTION 4: Suggested Advance Preparation for Students

The following advanced reading assignments and video excerpts can be assigned to students to prepare them for learning about Effective Communication for People with Hearing Loss.

Readings

Facts About the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Link: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/fs-ada.cfm

Revised ADA Requirements: Effective Communication | PDF
Source: Department of Justice
Link: ada.gov/effective-comm

Effective Communication: ADA Title II & III – Fact Sheet Series
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/communication

General Effective Communication Requirements Under Title II of the ADA
Source: ADA Best Practices Tool Kit for State and Local Governments
Link: ada.gov/pcatoolkit/chap3toolkit.htm

What kinds of auxiliary aids and services are required by the ADA to ensure effective communication with individuals with hearing or vision impairments?
Source: ADA National Network FAQs
Link: adata.org/faq/what-kinds-auxiliary-aids-and-services-are-required-ada-ensure-effective-communication

ADA Center News on New ADA Regulations on Effective Communication
Source: Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons
Link: www.ada.gov/resources/effective-communication/

ADA Effective Communication – Title III in American Sign Language (ASL)
Source: Disability and Communication Access Board (Honolulu)- YouTube Video
Link: youtube.com/watch?v=OdJ6WOeU61Q

Communicating with People Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: ADA Guide for Law Enforcement Officers
Source: U.S. Department of Justice – Civil Rights Division
Link: ada.gov/lawenfcomm.htm

Accommodation Examples
Source: Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/soar/hearing/hearingex.html

Employees with Hearing Loss
Source: Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/media/downloads/HearingA&CSeries.pdf

ADA Live Episode 4: Effective Communication
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-4/

Auxiliary Aids and Services for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities
Source: U.S. Department of Education
Link: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

Workbook

The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/publications/the-411-on-disability-disclosure-a-workbook-for-youth-with-disabilities/

Websites

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Search for ADA information by topic or type of disability.
Link: www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm

Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Search for information on job accommodations.
Link: askjan.org/media/index.htm

History of Gallaudet
Source: Gallaudet University
Link: www.gallaudet.edu/academic-catalog/about-gallaudet/history-of-gallaudet

The Week of Deaf President Now
Source: Gallaudet University
Link: www.gallaudet.edu/about/history-and-traditions/deaf-president-now/the-issues/the-week-of-dpn

Media

Disability Inclusion Starts with You (Captioned)
Source: Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP)
Link: www.dol.gov/ofccp/SelfIdVideo.html

Web Courses

Foundations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Web Course (Southeast ADA Center)

Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link:
bit.ly/foundations-ada-course

The ADA Foundations (bit.ly/foundations-ada-course) is a comprehensive web course designed to increase your knowledge and understanding of the core concepts about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). The web course has been developed to help you learn about the important concepts of the ADA and to think about inclusive solutions for people with disabilities in the workplace, state and local government programs, and private businesses.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this web course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the ADA using a civil rights framework.
  • Identify the five titles of the ADA.
  • Provide a basic overview of each title of the ADA.
  • Define the general nondiscrimination requirements of the ADA.
  • Explain each nondiscrimination requirement using 1-2 real-life examples.
  • Identify the defenses or limitations of each nondiscrimination requirement.
  • Identify the federal agencies responsible for enforcing each title of the ADA.
  • Locate and use resources for information on the ADA.

 

 

SECTION 5: Presentation

Pre-Module for the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: “Many of us do not use speech or do not voice for ourselves. However, we do use various ways to communicate with our family, friends, and people in our communities. Let’s make a list of all the ways we can think of that we use to communicate with others in our daily lives.”

Facilitator Note: Make a list of all responses from the group on a whiteboard, flip chart, etc., and save this list for an activity at the end of this module.

Today we are going to learn about the Americans with Disabilities Act and Effective Communication for people who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing through Auxiliary Aids and Services.

Facilitator Note: Use Module 9 PowerPoint slides, The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

 

 

Module 9: The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Slide 1 – Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Slide 1 Notes – Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Learning objective: The student will be able to define the terms “effective communication” and “auxiliary aids and services.”

Facilitator Talking Points:

Today we are going to learn about the Effective Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

 

 

Slide 2 – What is Effective Communication

Slide 2 Notes – What is Effective Communication?

Learning objective: The student will be able to define the terms “effective communication” and “auxiliary aids and services.”

Facilitator Talking Points:

We communicate in different ways. Some people speak English while others speak German or Spanish. Some people communicate using American Sign Language. Whatever language you speak, you want to be understood and understand the people around you. The Americans with Disabilities Act says that people need to be able to effectively communicate their wants and needs. Sometimes we can get by with writing a note or using our cell phone to text or send instant messages. Other times, when things are important, we want to make sure we understand exactly what is being discussed. In those situations, we may need a qualified sign language interpreter to help us.

 

 

Slide 3 – Providing Effective Communication through Auxiliary Aids and Services

Slide 3 Notes – Providing Effective Communication through Auxiliary Aids and Services

Learning objective: The student will be able to define the terms “effective communication” and “auxiliary aids and services.”

Facilitator Talking Points:

Interpreters are only one of several tools that people can use to communicate with others. Any device or service that provides equal access to communication is called an auxiliary aid and service. The word auxiliary means to provide additional help or support.

Slide 4 – Examples of Auxiliary Aids and Services for People Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Slide 4 Notes – Examples of Auxiliary Aids and Services for People Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Learning objective: The student will identify 3-5 ways that he/she can communicate.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Let’s talk about some of the ways we can communicate effectively. You may already use some of these tools.

  • Qualified Interpreter. The ADA defines a qualified interpreter as a person who is able to interpret effectively, accurately, and impartially, both receptively (i.e., understanding what the person with the disability is saying) and expressively (i.e., having the skill needed to convey information back to that person).
  • Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) is a on-demand service that provides communication between deaf or hard-of-hearing persons and hearing persons who are in the same location, using an interpreter by way of a computer with a webcam and Internet connection or a tablet using a cell phone connection.
  • Notetakers can be used to write out information for review later. Note takers can be very effective in college classes to document course lectures.
  • Computer Aided Real-Time Transcription (CART) is a method for instant translation of the spoken word into English text using a stenotype machine, notebook computer, and real-time The text produced by the CART service can be displayed on an individual’s computer monitor, projected onto a screen, combined with a video presentation to appear as captions, or otherwise made available using other transmission and display systems. (Source: https://nationaldisabilitynavigator.org/ndnrc-materials/disability-guide/computer-aided-real-time-transcription-cart/)
  • Written materials may include notes, handouts, lecture notes, or any written document that assists a person with effective communication.
  • Written notes can be effective for many daily interactions with people. Making a purchase at the grocery store, for instance, would not require any additional aid.
  • Telephone handset amplifiers increases the listening volume for an existing phone.
  • Assistive listening devices or systems are amplifiers that bring sound directly into the ear. They separate the sounds, particularly speech, that a person wants to hear from background noise.
  • Telephones compatible with hearing aids. There are laws that require telephones to be compatible with hearing aids. There are two types: (1) acoustic coupling where you hold the receiver up to your ear and (2) telecoil coupling where electromagnetic energy goes directly to the hearing aid processor.
  • Open and closed captioning allows captioning on video displays such as televisions to allow full enjoyment of programs.
  • Text telephones (TTY). A text telephone (TTY) is a device that lets people who are Deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-impaired use the telephone to communicate, by allowing a person to type messages back and forth to one another instead of talking and listening. A TTY is required at both ends of the conversation in order to communicate. (Source: http://www.abouttty.com/)
  • Video Phone. A video phone is a device that assists Deaf and hard-of-hearing people who use sign language to communicate with others. The phones can be used by Deaf people to communicate with each other over the phone or with hearing people through a sign language interpreter.
  • Captioned A captioned telephone is a special telephone that has a built-in screen to display in text (captions) everything the other person on the call says. (Source: https://www.nad.org/resources/technology/telephone-and-relay-services/captioned-telephone-service-cts/)
  • Videotext display is an older technology that delivers information, usually text, to a computer or television.
  • Accessible electronic and information technology can be used by people with a wide range of abilities and disabilities. Each user is able to interact with the technology in ways that work best for him or her.
  • Email is a method of exchanging messages between people using electronic devices.
  • Text messages are alphabetic and numeric character messages sent between two or more users of mobile phones, tablets, desk top computers, laptops, or other devices. Text messages may be sent over a cellular network or the Internet.
  • Instant messaging is done in real-time and allows text transmission over the internet.

 

Slide 5 – ADA and Equal Access to Government Services

Slide 5 Notes – ADA and Equal Access to Government Services

Learning objective: The student will be able to describe how the ADA’s effective communication requirements apply to state and local government.

Facilitator Talking Points:

State and local governments are covered by Title 2 (or section 2) of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA says that state and local government agencies must make sure that all of its programs, activities, and services can be enjoyed and used by all people. This includes you!

For example, you may want to attend a city council meeting. Your city has the responsibility to make sure that you can communicate and fully participate in the meeting. They might have a qualified sign language interpreter or CART transcriber in the room.

Slide 6 – Communicating with Your Government

Slide 6 Notes – Communicating with Your Government

Learning objective: The student will be able to describe how the ADA’s effective communication requirements apply to state and local government.

Facilitator Talking Points:

The most important thing to remember is that your government must make sure that you can participate equally and in a way that you prefer. Your favorite was to communicate should always be the first choice.

 

 

Slide 7 – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Libraries

Slide 7 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Libraries

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify 1 method of effective communication at public libraries.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Libraries are very important to communities. They are places to learn new things, places to study, and places that allow us to follow our interests. Long before anybody ever thought about the ADA, libraries were places of equal access to information. Today, libraries continue to be a place where anybody can go and equally use the library services. Since libraries are a function of local government, they must make sure their buildings, services, and the way they do business is equal for all people. This includes effective communication. Libraries must be accessible for people who are deaf or hard of hearing by providing qualified sign language interpreters, assistive listening systems, and captioning on all their videos

Slide 8– Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Parks and Recreational Facilities

Slide 8 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Parks and Recreational Facilities

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least 1 method of effective communication at parks and recreational facilities.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Everybody enjoys the opportunity to get outside and enjoy a park. Government agencies are required to make sure all people can enjoy parks and recreation programs equally. Parks and recreation staff must be able to communicate with the public in order to provide information on the services and programs offered. They also need to make sure that all people can communicate equally in all park activities and programs.

 

 

Slide 9 – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Voting and the Election Process

Slide 9 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Voting and the Election Process

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least 1 method of effective communication when voting.

Facilitator Talking Points:

One of the most important things we can do as citizens is to vote. Voting is how we decide about the laws that we need and who will represent us in government. The ADA ensures that we all have the opportunity to vote by making sure voting locations are accessible, voter registration is fair, voting booths are accessible, and easy to use. Governments must provide sign language interpreters, be able to write notes back and forth, when appropriate, and be able to communicate and answer questions and concerns for all citizens in a way the citizen chooses.

Slide 10 – ADA and Equal Access in Places of Public Accommodation

Slide 10 Notes – ADA and Equal Access in Places of Public Accommodation

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least 2 places of public accommodation that he/she visits on a regular basis in his/her daily activities.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Before the ADA, there were no rules allowing people with disabilities to have equal access to private businesses in the community. The stores, restaurants, and arenas (known as public accommodations under the ADA) were not accessible to all people. Today, because of Title III of the ADA, businesses must make sure that they can communicate with all customers.

We all enjoy meeting our friends at a restaurant or basketball game. What if you couldn’t communicate with the waiter or understand what the announcer was saying? Restaurant staff should be prepared to write notes or use other simple forms of communication, if necessary. At arenas, people who are deaf or hard of hearing should have access to closed captioning, assisted listening devices, and captioning on video display screens. You should also be able to communicate in your preferred way when purchasing tickets.

Slide 11 – What is a “Public Accommodation” Required to Provide?

Slide 11 Notes – What is a “Public Accommodation” Required to Provide?

Learning objective: The student will be able to explain public accommodation’s requirement to provide effective communication.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Let’s dream for a few minutes. You have saved money for a down payment on your first car. In order to buy the car, you need a car loan to pay for the difference between your down payment and the total cost of the car. You go to your bank to take out a car loan. There are many complicated things that go on when you get a loan from a bank. You want to make sure you understand everything that is said and what your responsibilities are for repaying the loan. Passing notes with the bank officer may be fine if you are making a bank deposit but not when you are getting a loan. The bank is responsible for arranging for a qualified interpreter or other method of communication you prefer.

Effective communication will be different depending on the circumstances. You would not need an interpreter to order at a restaurant. Writing notes with the server will be fine. However, in circumstances that are important, you have the right to communicate effectively.

Slide 12 – Examples of Effective Communication in Places of Public Accommodation – Movie Theaters

Slide 12 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Places of Public Accommodation – Movie Theaters

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least 1 method of effective communication at movie theaters or other entertainment locations.

Facilitator Talking Points:

You have rights when you go to the movies, plays or concerts. These places must provide preferred seats in various locations for people with disabilities and up to three friends. Movie theaters, where digital format is used, must provide captioning, assisted listening devices and video display screens. In the picture on this slide, someone is using a video display. There is a new technology emerging where your smart phone can take the place of a video display for captioning.

 

 

Slide 13 – Examples of Effective Communication in Places of Public Accommodation – Sports Stadiums

Slide 13 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Places of Public Accommodation – Sports Stadiums

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least one method of effective communication at sports venues.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Do you enjoy going to sports events? Maybe you like the NFL or college basketball. Arenas where sporting events are held also have to provide for effective communication. Video screens in the arena should provide captioning of announcements, plays and referee calls, announcements, and end of game announcements.
Slide 14 – Examples of Effective Communication in Places of Public Accommodation – Doctor’s Office

Slide 14 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Places of Public Accommodation – Doctor’s Office

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least 1 method of effective communication doctor’s office.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Taking care of our health needs is a very important thing. We need to be able to make decisions about the care we receive. Doctor’s offices are places of public accommodation and must provide effective communication for patients. In addition to providing qualified interpreters, doctor’s office staff should be familiar with TTY, relay services, and other telephone communication systems.
Slide 15 – Do I have to Pay for an Interpreter or Other Modification?

Slide 15 Notes – Do I have to Pay for an Interpreter or Other Modification?

Learning objective: The student will understand their rights under ADA when making a request for effective communication.

Facilitator Talking Points:

We have focused on effective communication and your rights under the ADA when enjoying the benefits of government programs and services and places in the community where we shop, watch movies, or go to the doctor.

You might think “This is great! But, do I have to pay for an interpreter?” The answer is “no.” Because state and local governments and places of public accommodation are required to provide effective communication, if you need an interpreter they are required to provide one. Also, they cannot make you pay for the interpreter’s time. That is a charge the business or government must cover.

Post Module for the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: Using the list from the Pre-Module activity, ask if the group would like to add to the list any other ways to communicate with others in our daily lives.

Then ask the group to name a circumstance where each way of communicating might be effective, and another situation where that same way of communicating might not be effective for some reason. Have the group discuss whether or not they agree that it will or will not be effective in that situation, and why or why not.

 

 

SECTION 6: Learning Activities

For the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: Learning activities have been designed to reinforce the content from the PowerPoint presentation. A menu of activities has been provided. You may choose one or more activities based upon the time that you have to present the material and upon the needs of the students. For each interactive activity designed to reinforce the content from the PowerPoint presentation, suggested time frames are included below. Please keep in mind the age of your youth as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group.

Activity #1 Group Discussion

Facilitator Note: Please allow time frames for these discussions and activities that are appropriate for the size of the group and the makeup of the group. Please be flexible if the discussion or the sharing is productive, and the participants are actively engaged.

Activity: “What is Effective Communication? It depends!”

Time: 5 – 15 minutes
Facilitator Script:
“Effective Communication depends on the circumstances. For example, let’s think about a place we might go in our community, and think about the difference it will make depending on what we might want to do at that place.”

“If we go to the public library to find a biography for a famous person, what might be an effective way to communicate with the librarian?” (Reinforce all responses for simple communications such as pointing, gesturing, writing notes, etc.) Now, what if you want to go to the public library to hear a book reading by a local author? What would you need for effective communication in that situation?” (Reinforce responses such as an assistive listening device, a sign language interpreter, CART, etc.)

“If we go to the movie theater to buy tickets for a blockbuster movie that starts next weekend, what might be an effective way to communicate with the person at the box office selling the tickets?” (Reinforce all responses for simple communications such as pointing, gesturing, writing notes, etc.) “Now, what would you need for effective communication when you go to see the movie next weekend:” (Reinforce responses such as an assistive listening device, open or closed captions, CART, etc.)

“If we have an appointment to review the results of extensive lab tests ordered by our medical provider, what might be an effective way to communicate with the person at the check-in window?” (Reinforce all responses for simple communication such as showing an ID or medical card, writing notes, pointing, gesturing, etc.) “Now, what would you need for effective communication when the medical provider is explaining the results of the many lab tests and what that means for your health?” (Reinforce responses such as an assistive listening device, a sign language interpreter, CART, etc.)

“What are some other circumstances you can think of when what you need for effective communication will depend on what you are doing at a specific place in the community?”

Activity #2 Art Projects

Activity: “What Does Effective Communication Look Like?”

Time: 15 minutes or more
Facilitator Note: Using any art materials and a large piece of paper (drawing paper, flip-chart pages, etc.), have each person create two pictures as follows.

Facilitator Script: “Fold your paper in half lengthwise like this (demonstrate for the group) and then unfold your paper so that you have a box on the left and a box on the right. Now, think of a place you like to go in the community, and think of two different ways you use to communicate when you go to that place in the community. What kinds of things are you doing when you use each of the different ways to communicate effectively? Draw a picture of what you are doing and the kind of communication you are using in each of your two boxes. Be sure that you are showing two different ways of communicating depending on what you are doing. At the bottom of your paper, write the place in the community where you like to go. When I call time, we will get back together to share our artwork and to share about the different ways we use to communicate effectively in our community.”

Activity #3 Dramatic Arts

Facilitator Note: If your group is especially engaged by dramatic arts, such as role plays, skits, improvisation, etc., you might use dramatic arts activities.

Activity: “Effective Communication—Let Me Be Clear!”

Time: 15 minutes or more
Facilitator Note: Using partners or small groups, have each pair or each small group create a skit about effective communication at a specific place in the community, and act out the skit in front of the group. Write places in the community such as the list below on small index cards, and give one place in the community to each pair or small group. Following each dramatic arts performance, ask for feedback from the group about the effective communication techniques shown in the skit. Ask the group if they have any suggestions for the situation shown in the skit.

Possible Places in the Community to write on Index Cards:

  • Retail Stores
  • Movie Theaters
  • Sports Arenas
  • Restaurants
  • Doctor’s Office
  • Local Bank
  • Polling Places for Voting
  • Yoga Class at Parks & Recreation Center
  • Nature Walk in City Park
  • Public Library
  • City Museum
  • City Council Meeting at City Hall

Facilitator Note: If you know some favorite places your group likes to go in the community, consider including these on the index cards for use in creating skits about effective communication.

Activity #4 Role Models

Facilitator Note: For young people with disabilities, it is very important to identify with role models who are people with disabilities living independently in the community. Sources for finding role models that may serve as guest speakers in class include:

Activity 4A: “And Now, A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5–15 minutes
Facilitator Note
: Invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 – 4 people with Hearing loss to briefly share about a time when each one had to advocate for their rights to effective communication under the ADA. Then allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

Activity 4B: Virtual Reality—”A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5 – 15 minutes

Facilitator Note: Using Zoom or a similar platform, invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 to 4 people with Hearing loss to briefly share about a time when each one had to advocate for their rights to effective communication under the ADA. Then allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

SECTION 7: Handouts or Materials Needed

  • Audiovisual equipment for PowerPoint presentation and/or videos.
  • Art materials, blank paper, colored pencils or markers, rubber ball, and a bottle of liquid bubbles (Activity 1).
  • Photocopies of PowerPoint slides, including alternate formats such as large print, Braille, and electronic formats, such as a USB drive for students with visual or print disabilities.

SECTION 8: After Class

Homework Possibilities

Interview someone at home, your school, in your neighborhood or in the community. Ask one or more of the following questions:

  • Can you tell me about a time or situation when you had to request an accommodation or ask for help in a public place?
  • Can you tell me how you asked for help when you need it?
  • Can you tell me about a time when you had to know about your legal rights?

During the next session, we will share these interviews with the group.

Facilitator Note: You may wish to identify several people in the community who would be willing to assist with this homework assignment. Refer to Section 9 – Community Organizations for possible contacts. Students may also want to interview someone they know such as a family member or friend. The contacts for the exercise may be people with and without disabilities.

Quiz Questions

Use these quiz questions to reinforce learning by giving this pop quiz at the end of class, as a homework assignment, or at the beginning of the next class session. Correct answers are noted with an asterisk (*).

  1. Auxiliary aides are devices and services help us to effectively communicate.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Email or text messages can be a form of effective communication.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Local governments can decide which type of communication is convenient for them and would also work for you.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. Governments must make sure you can communicate in your preferred way when you vote in elections.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. If my preferred communication style is not available, then my government does not have to come up with another auxiliary aid.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. Sports stadiums should have real time captioning of announcements and plays.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. If you need a sign language interpreter, you are responsible for paying for the service.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. Election officials should have pen and paper available and be prepared to write out questions at the polling place check-in table for a voter who is D/deaf and can communicate through written communications.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Libraries do not have to provide auxiliary aids for effective communication.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. Government programs should provide auxiliary aids so I can participate.
  • Yes*
  • No

SECTION 9: Resources for Students

Additional Reading and Videos

Fact Sheet: An Overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/ADA-overview

Video – Overview of the ADA
Source: ADA National Network and New England ADA Center
Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ns7UY8HdPr8 (6:41 minutes)

Video: ADA Signing Ceremony (22 minutes)
Source: U.S. Department of Justice
Link: www.ada.gov/videogallery.htm#ADAsigning990 (22 minutes)

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/publication/disability-law-handbook

Meet the Deaf-Blind Lawyer Fighting For People With Disabilities
Source: Popsugar
Link: www.popsugar.com/news/Deaf-Blind-Lawyer-Haben-Girma-44540036

American Sign Language
Source: Gallaudet University
Link: clerccenter.gallaudet.edu

American Sign Language – ASL Lesson 01
Source: YouTube
Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9cFqNYlV1A

The First 100 Signs You Need to Know!
Source: YouTube
Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUMEcnkvhJU

Computer Aided Real-Time Transcription (CART)
Source: National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative
Link: nationaldisabilitynavigator.org/ndnrc-materials/disability-guide/computer-aided-real-time-transcription-cart/

Americans with Disabilities Act Information Center

ADA National Network

Phone: 1-800-949-4232 (toll free)

Website: adata.org

Facebook: facebook.com/adanetwork

Twitter: twitter.com/ADANational

National Resources

Community Organizations

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