Links Module 4

SECTION 2: Strategies for Customization

Adapting and Making Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

The following resources provide guidance on working with students with a variety of disabilities. The resources provide information about adaptations that can be made to instructional techniques and accommodations that can be provided to increase inclusion in the classroom.

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching
Link: cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/disabilities/

Successful Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities
Source: Learning Disabilities Association of America
Link: ldaamerica.org/successful-strategies-for-teaching-students-with-learning-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/teaching/topics/inclusive-teaching/teaching-students-with-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: University of Rochester
Link: www.rochester.edu/college/teaching/teaching-guidance/students-with-disabilities.html

Etiquette for Working with Students with Disabilities
Source: Best Colleges
Link: www.bestcolleges.com/resources/disability-etiquette/

Students with Disabilities in the College Classroom
Source: HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center
Link: www.heath.gwu.edu/students-disabilities-college-classroom

College for Students with Disabilities: A Guide for Students, Families, and Educators
Source: Maryville University
Link: online.maryville.edu/disabilities-guide/

Tips for Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: The University of Wyoming — University Disability Support Services
Link: www.uwyo.edu/wind/echo OR www.uwyo.edu/wind/index.html

Invisible Disabilities and Postsecondary Education
Source: DO IT Center, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/invisible-disabilities-and-postsecondary-education
Related Video – Captioned and Audio Described (18:44 minutes)
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/videos/index.php?vid=36

How to Teach and Accommodate
Source: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Link: www.umassd.edu/dss/resources/faculty-staff/how-to-teach-and-accommodate/

23 Ways to Communicate with a Non-Verbal Child
Source: Special Needs Resources
Link: www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2013/04/16/23-ways-to-communicate-with-a-non-verbal-child/

Instructional Strategies
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies

At a Glance: Classroom Accommodations for Nonverbal Learning Disabilities
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies/at-a-glance-classroom-accommodations-for-nonverbal-learning-disabilities

Customizing the Lesson Using Presentation Material and Interactive Exercises

There are three sets of resources provided that can be woven together to customize the learning experience, depending on your goals as a facilitator for this particular lesson on the ADA and Higher Education (e.g., providing a very simple introduction versus teaching the basics as a platform for having students engage in deeper learning about complex examples). These include: (1) advance preparation material that students can review; (2) a set of PowerPoint slides that can be used in a presentation and discussion format; and (3) a set of interactive exercises to stimulate applied learning, creativity, and deeper thinking about the concepts.

1.    Advance Preparation Material for Students

This lesson provides a very simple, high-level overview of The ADA in Higher Education. The goal is to introduce students to the idea of requesting accommodations in a higher education setting. Suggested resources for advance preparation include readings and videos about post-secondary education and the ADA and requesting accommodations.

As noted, these materials can be provided in advance to students, or if the class session is long enough, they may be used in class prior to presenting the PowerPoint slides and getting into a specific discussion of the ADA. Alternatively, they could be used as both advance preparation (pre-homework) and repeated in class to reinforce the learning.

2.   PowerPoint Slides

The PowerPoint slides can be used in class to provide an overview of The ADA in the Higher Education. Combined with the interactive exercises, the presentation can be extended to cover a long class session or multiple smaller class sessions. The slides can also be presented on their own as part of a short lesson on The ADA in Higher Education.

3.   Interactive Exercises

Several interactive exercises are provided to engage the students in considering specific examples that relate to the material “The ADA in Higher Education”. For example, while the presentation material explains the ADA and discusses the accommodation process, an interactive exercise leads the students to practice how to request an accommodation. Therefore, the exercise provides a concrete lesson on the accommodation process and explains how the ADA is a law that applies to colleges and universities.

SECTION 3: Suggested Advance Preparation for Facilitators

Readings

Fact Sheet: Postsecondary Institutions and Students with Disabilities
Espanol – Instituciones De Educación Postsecundaria Y Estudiantes Con Discapacidades
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/postsecondary
Link (Spanish): adata.org/factsheet/postsecondary-esp

Fact Sheet: Exams and Courses
Espanol – Exámenes Y Cursos
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/exams
Link (Spanish): adata.org/factsheet/exams-esp

FAQ: What Are a Public or Private College-University’s Responsibilities to Students with Disabilities?
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/faq/what-are-public-or-private-college-universitys-responsibilities-students-disabilities

Research: From Paternalism to Self-Advocacy: President Obama’s Community College Strategy and Students with Disabilities
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/research/paternalism-self-advocacy-obama-s-community-college-strategy-and-students-disabilities

ADA Q & A: Section 504 & Postsecondary Education (Fact Sheet)
Source: The PACER Center
Link: www.pacer.org/publications/adaqa/504.asp

Reasonable Accommodations Explained
Source: American Psychological Association
Link: www.apa.org/pi/disability/dart/toolkit-three.aspx

Advising high school students with disabilities on postsecondary options
Source: HEATH Resource Center, The George Washington University
Link: heath.gwu.edu/sites/heath.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Toolkit%202014.pdf

Career planning begins with assessment
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/publications/career-planning-begins-with-assessment-a-guide-for-professionals-serving-youth-with-educational-and-career-development-challenges/

Age-appropriate transition assessment
Source: Division on Career Development and Transition (DCDT)
Link: higherlogicdownload.s3.amazonaws.com/SPED/34aee1c1-7ded-4d59-af82-da4af08d5fc4/UploadedImages/DCDT_Fast_Facts/Age_Appropriate_Transition_Assessment.pdf

Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities
Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights
Link: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transition.html

Transition to postsecondary education: A guide for high school educators
Source: U.S. Department of Education
Link: www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transitionguide.html

Effective college planning
Source: Western New York College Consortium of Disability Advocates
Link: www.wnyccda.org/resources.html

Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities
Source: U.S. Department of Education
Link: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transition.html

Families and College and Career Readiness: What Schools Can Do to Engage Families in the Individualized Learning Plan (ILP) Process
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/families-and-college-and-career-readiness

Helping Youth with Learning Disabilities Chart the Course: A Guide for Youth Service Professionals
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/information-brief/helping-youth-with-learning-disabilities-chart-the-course

How Young People Can Benefit from One-Stop Centers
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/publications/how-young-people-can-benefit-from-one-stop-centers/

Websites

Think College
Source: University of Massachusetts Boston
Link: www.thinkcollege.net

Going to College
Source: Virginia Commonwealth University
Link: www.going-to-college.org

AHEAD – Association on Higher Education and Disability
Link: www.ahead.org

National Secondary Transition and Technical Assistance CenterLink: www.nsttac.org

DO-IT: Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology
Resources for students, employers and educators promoting barrier free education.
Source: University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/

HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center
Source: George Washington University
Link: www.heath.gwu.edu

Overview of College Resources for Students with Disabilities
This guide helps students with disabilities learn about their legal rights, where to find assistance on campus, and an extensive list of web sites, apps and software resources. It is searchable by college name, state, degree type, and more.
Source:
Best Colleges
Link: www.bestcolleges.com/resources/disabled-students/

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Disability Consortium
Source: Black, Disabled, and Proud
Link: www.blackdisabledandproud.org

Media

ADA Live! Episode 11: Higher Education and Students with Disabilities (August 6, 2014)
Audio/MP3 file, captioned version and transcript available.
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Podcast Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-11/
Resource List: adalive.org/resources/episode-11-resources/

ADA Live! Episode 28: Post-Secondary Education and Students with Disabilities (January 6, 2016)
Audio/MP3 file, captioned version and transcript available.
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Podcast Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-28/

ADA Live! Episode 29: Supported and Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (February 3, 2016)
Audio/MP3 file, captioned version and transcript available.
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Podcast Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-29/

ADA Live! Episode 45: Think College: Inclusive Higher Education for People with Intellectual Disability (June 7, 2017)
Audio/MP3 file, captioned version and transcript available.
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Podcast Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-45/
Resource List: adalive.org/resources/episode-45-resources/

Web Course

Foundations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Web Course (Southeast ADA Center)
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link:
bit.ly/foundations-ada-course

The ADA Foundations (bit.ly/foundations-ada-course) is a comprehensive web course designed to increase your knowledge and understanding of the core concepts about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). The web course has been developed to help you learn about the important concepts of the ADA and to think about inclusive solutions for people with disabilities in the workplace, state and local government programs, and private businesses.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this web course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the ADA using a civil rights framework.
  • Identify the five titles of the ADA.
  • Provide a basic overview of each title of the ADA.
  • Define the general nondiscrimination requirements of the ADA.
  • Explain each nondiscrimination requirement using 1-2 real-life examples.
  • Identify the defenses or limitations of each nondiscrimination requirement.
  • Identify the federal agencies responsible for enforcing each title of the ADA.
  • Locate and use resources for information on the ADA.

SECTION 4: Suggested Advance Preparation for Students

The following advanced reading assignments and video excerpts can be assigned to students to prepare them for learning about Disclosure, Self-Identification, and Discussing Your Disability

Readings

Fact Sheet: Postsecondary Institutions and Students with Disabilities
Espanol – Instituciones De Educación Postsecundaria Y Estudiantes Con Discapacidades
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/postsecondary
Link (Spanish): adata.org/factsheet/postsecondary-esp

Fact Sheet: Exams and Courses
Espanol – Exámenes Y Cursos
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/exams
Link (Spanish): adata.org/factsheet/exams-esp

FAQ: What Are a Public or Private College-University’s Responsibilities to Students with Disabilities?
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/faq/what-are-public-or-private-college-universitys-responsibilities-students-disabilities

ADA Q & A: Section 504 & Postsecondary Education (Fact Sheet)
Source: The PACER Center
Link: www.pacer.org/publications/adaqa/504.asp

Reasonable Accommodations Explained
Source: American Psychological Association
Link: www.apa.org/pi/disability/dart/toolkit-three.aspx

Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities
Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights
Link: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/transition.html

Effective college planning
Source: Western New York College Consortium of Disability Advocates
Link: www.wnyccda.org/resources.html

Families and College and Career Readiness: What Schools Can Do to Engage Families in the Individualized Learning Plan (ILP) Process
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/families-and-college-and-career-readiness

Helping Youth with Learning Disabilities Chart the Course: A Guide for Youth Service Professionals
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/information-brief/helping-youth-with-learning-disabilities-chart-the-course

How Young People Can Benefit from One-Stop Centers
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/publications/how-young-people-can-benefit-from-one-stop-centers/

A Practical Guide for People with Disabilities Who Want to Go to CollegeSource: Temple University
Link: tucollaborative.org/sdm_downloads/going-to-college-with-a-disability/

College Planning Handbook for Students with DisabilitiesSource: Education Quest
Link: www.educationquest.org/pdfs/Disability_Handbook.pdf

Navigating College – A Handbook on Self Advocacy for Students with Autism
Source: Autism Self Advocacy Network
Link: autisticadvocacy.org/book/navigating-college/

Auxiliary Aids and Services for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities
Source: U.S. Department of Education
Link: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

Secondary Transition Toolkit: A toolkit for youth, by youth
Source: Pennsylvania Youth Leadership Network
Link: transition-guide-admin.s3.amazonaws.com/files/2012/07/17/PYLN%20Secondary%20Transition%20Toolkit.pdf

Stories of transition to the adult world
Source: Wisconsin Healthy & Ready to Work a Series of Materials Supporting Youth with Special Health Care Needs
Link: waismanucedd.wiscweb.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/74/2017/05/Transitionstories.pdf

Websites

Think College
Source: University of Massachusetts Boston
Link: www.thinkcollege.net

Going to College
Source: Virginia Commonwealth University
Link: www.going-to-college.org

AHEAD – Association on Higher Education and Disability
Link: www.ahead.org

National Secondary Transition and Technical Assistance CenterLink: www.nsttac.org

DO-IT: Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology
Resources for students, employers and educators promoting barrier free education.
Source: University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/

HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center
Source: George Washington University
Link: www.heath.gwu.edu

Overview of College Resources for Students with Disabilities
This guide helps students with disabilities learn about their legal rights, where to find assistance on campus, and an extensive list of web sites, apps and software resources. It is searchable by college name, state, degree type, and more.
Source:
Best Colleges
Link: www.bestcolleges.com/resources/disabled-students/

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Disability Consortium
Source: Black, Disabled, and Proud
Link: www.blackdisabledandproud.org

Media

ADA Live! Episode 11: Higher Education and Students with Disabilities (August 6, 2014)
Audio/MP3 file, captioned version and transcript available.
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Podcast Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-11/
Resource List: adalive.org/resources/episode-11-resources/

ADA Live! Episode 28: Post-Secondary Education and Students with Disabilities (January 6, 2016)
Audio/MP3 file, captioned version and transcript available.
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Podcast Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-28/

ADA Live! Episode 29: Supported and Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (February 3, 2016)
Audio/MP3 file, captioned version and transcript available.
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Podcast Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-29/

ADA Live! Episode 45: Think College: Inclusive Higher Education for People with Intellectual Disability (June 7, 2017)
Audio/MP3 file, captioned version and transcript available.
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Podcast Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-45/
Resource List: adalive.org/resources/episode-45-resources/

Web Course

Foundations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Web Course (Southeast ADA Center)
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link:
bit.ly/foundations-ada-course

The ADA Foundations (bit.ly/foundations-ada-course) is a comprehensive web course designed to increase your knowledge and understanding of the core concepts about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). The web course has been developed to help you learn about the important concepts of the ADA and to think about inclusive solutions for people with disabilities in the workplace, state and local government programs, and private businesses.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this web course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the ADA using a civil rights framework.
  • Identify the five titles of the ADA.
  • Provide a basic overview of each title of the ADA.
  • Define the general nondiscrimination requirements of the ADA.
  • Explain each nondiscrimination requirement using 1-2 real-life examples.
  • Identify the defenses or limitations of each nondiscrimination requirement.
  • Identify the federal agencies responsible for enforcing each title of the ADA.
  • Locate and use resources for information on the ADA.

 

SECTION 5: Presentation

Pre-Module for the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: You may have (or have had) an accommodation that helped you in school so far. If so, the same accommodation might help you in college or technical college. In grades kindergarten – 12, many people can help you when you are having problems in school, including parents, family members, and teachers. At a university, two – or four-year college, community college, or technical college, you are the one who decides whether or not to disclose your disability. For this session, we are going to call all of these places “college” for ease. This means that you are the only one who can ask for help. When you have problems and you need an accommodation, you must use your self-advocacy skills to get the accommodation you need. You already know which accommodations helped you in K – 12, and the same accommodations might help you in college. Let’s make a list of the accommodations you can think of that have helped you in school. Record this list of accommodations and keep it to be used at the end of this module.

Today, we are going to learn about how the Americans with Disabilities Act can help us in higher education, which means college.

Facilitator Note: Use the Module 4 PowerPoint slides, Pathways to Careers… The ADA in Higher Education.

Module 4 PowerPoint slides, Pathways to Careers… The ADA in Higher Education

Slide 1 – Pathways to Careers…. ADA in Higher Education

Slide 1 Notes – Pathways to Careers…. ADA in the Higher Education

Objective: The student will be introduced to the topic of “The ADA in Higher Education” and ADA Requirements for colleges and universities.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Today we are going to learn about the Americans with Disabilities Act and how it can help us in college.

 

 

Slide 2 – How Can the ADA Help Me Go to College or Vocational School?

Slide 2 Notes – How Can the ADA Help Me Go to College or Technical college?

Objective: The student will learn about rights and responsibilities they have under the ADA in higher education settings.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Throughout your years in school, you have benefited from laws that say your school must provide you with an education that is designed to meet your learning style. These laws have helped you get to this point in your life. Now, as you get ready to move on to the next phase of your life, you need to think about what you are going to do next. Some people will choose to go to work. Other people, maybe you, want to continue going to school. Maybe you are interested in learning a trade like plumbing or being an electrician. You want to earn a degree from a college or university. If you choose to continue going to school, you need to know that the ADA can help you.

Slide 3 – How Are High School and College or Technical College Different?

Slide 3 Notes – How Are High School and College or Technical College Different?
Objective: The student will learn how their rights and responsibilities change from high school to college.

Facilitator Talking Points:
You have the same right as anybody else to go as far as your abilities and ambition can take you. But, you also need to know that the way you get accommodations in college is different than the accommodations you receive in high school. The ADA says that you can still get the help and accommodations you need to succeed in class in college. BUT your accommodations are not automatic. In college, you have to disclose your disability and you have to request an accommodation. Also, if you have difficulty with a class in high school, you can take that class again. So, if you need accommodation to be successful, disclosing your disability and getting help is very important. It is also important to ask for this help as soon as you realize you are having problems or if you know ahead of time that you may need an accommodation.

Slide 4 – The ADA and Higher Education (College)

Slide 4 Notes – The ADA and Higher Education (College)

Objective: The student will gain an understanding of the student’s and the college’s responsibilities under the ADA.

Facilitator Talking Points:
When you get to college, you can decide if you want, or need, to disclose your disability. Even if your disability is obvious—for instance, if you use a wheelchair or have low vision, you don’t have to explain about your disability to your teachers. It is your choice whether or not to disclose your disability. And, it is your choice about asking for help.

In high school, you probably had some accommodations for your disability: changes like getting your textbooks in audio format, getting help from a resource teacher, or being given more time to take tests. In college, you may also need supports like these to be successful. The Disability Services Office, or the person responsible for assisting with accommodations if there is no separate office, will work with you to figure out the accommodations you need.

Slide 5 – What Accommodations Can I Request in College?

Slide 5 Notes – What Accommodations Can I Request in College?

Objective: The student will learn about accommodations in the college setting.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Here are some accommodations that help people be successful in college. Of course, this slide does not list every accommodation a student can request but these are the most common.

  • For people who have blindness or low vision and people who have a hard time understanding what they read, audio books can be a good accommodation. Some people understand books better if they listen to them.
  • Someone who is D/deaf may need a sign language interpreter to understand a lecture or to ask questions.
  • Many times, people who read slowly or take longer to understand what they are reading get additional time to take tests.
  • If someone can’t write or writes slowly, he/she may have the option of taking tests on a computer or dictating his/her answers to a designated assistant.
  • Sometimes a person cannot concentrate in large classrooms. He/she may get very anxious and need things to be very quiet. This student can request a quiet room to take a test as an accommodation.
  • A person may have difficulty taking notes in class. The Disability Services Office may assign a person to take notes.

Let’s think about some accommodations that you might need. Make a list of possible accommodations.

Slide 6 – How Do I Get Accommodations in College?

Slide 6 Notes – How Do I Get Accommodations in College?

Objective: The student will learn about using the Disability Services Office at the college or university.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Colleges have Disability Services Offices (DSO) or a designated person who assists with accommodations. Disability Services is where you need to go to talk with someone about getting an accommodation. The DSO determines if you are eligible for accommodations as a student with disability.

If you need an accommodation, you will need to disclose your disability, provide a record of your disability, and work with the Disability Services to get the accommodation. They also serve as a resource to teachers in helping them understand their responsibility in providing equal access.

Remember, it is your responsibility to disclose your disability. Otherwise, a teacher may not have to accommodate you unless they are told to do so by Disability Services. Also, as soon as you realize you are going to need an accommodation, visit the Disability Service Office right away. In fact, it’s a good idea to visit them before each semester starts so that your accommodations can be set up so that you can be successful in class.

Slide 7 – Does My College Have to Provide an Accommodation?

Slide 7 Notes – Does My College Have to Provide an Accommodation?

Objective: The student will gain an understanding about some of the rights that the college has under ADA.

Facilitator Talking Points:

The Disability Service Office is there to help you get accommodations. They are usually able to help you get what you need as an accommodation.

However, if what you need makes so many changes to how you are taking a class that the teacher cannot figure out if you made “satisfactory academic progress,” then you also cannot get that particular accommodation.

Colleges also don’t have to provide help with personal accommodations, such as help with eating, getting dressed, or going to the bathroom.

Slide 8 – Other Important Resources

Slide 8 Notes – Other Important Resources

Objective: The student will learn about other post-secondary inclusion resources.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Think College is a program that helps students learn about opportunities to go to college. You can learn a lot about college and if college is right for you at their website – www.thinkcollege.net

 

 

Slide 9 – How Can Vocational Rehabilitation Help Me?

Slide 9 Notes – How Can Vocational Rehabilitation Help Me?

Objective: The student will learn how Vocational Rehabilitation can help students go to college.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Vocational Rehabilitation Department provides counseling and guidance to high school students with disabilities about college. Vocational Rehabilitation (also known as VR) is a great resource for learning about education and career training opportunities. VR may also help pay for some supports, equipment, assistive technology, or other resources related to your disability that you need to be successful in college.

 

 

Post Module for the Training Facilitator:

Post-Module Facilitator Note: After you have completed the PowerPoint and learning activities, summarize the session(s) with the group.

From the Pre-Module activity, post the list of accommodations and ask the group what they would like to add to the lists.

“Now that we have talked about accommodations in college, let’s see if we can add to the list we started before. Did you learn about new accommodations? Do you think any of these accommodations might help you in college? If so, let’s add those to our lists.”

 

SECTION 6: Learning Activities

For the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: Learning activities have been designed to reinforce the content from the PowerPoint presentation and/or videos. A menu of activities has been provided. You may choose one or more activities based upon the time that you have to present the material and upon the needs of the students. For each interactive activity, suggested time frames are included with each activity. Please keep in mind the age of your students, their individual skill levels, and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group.

Activity #1: Group Discussion

Facilitator Note: Please allow time frames for these discussions and activities that are appropriate for the size of the group and the nature of the makeup of the group. Please be flexible if the discussion or the sharing is productive, and the participants are actively engaged.

Activity 1A: “Same Accommodation, but Different Disabilities”

Time: 5 – 10 minutes
Facilitator Script
: “One accommodation sometimes can help several students with difficulties they are having in the learning process, even though their disabilities are not the same. Let’s take a look at some accommodations that help students with disabilities when they are having difficulties. We will explore why the accommodation might be helpful because of the disability the student might have.”

Audio Books

“Why do you think audio books and being able to listen to information instead of having to read print might be helpful?

What disabilities might a student have that would be helped by audio books?” (If you need probes, you might ask, “What do you do with your hands when you are reading a book?” to prompt limited use of hands to hold a book or turn pages; or “Can you think of a reason why someone cannot make sense of text when they look at print?” to prompt a learning disability or dyslexia; or “What if a person cannot see the print?” to prompt vision loss or blindness.)

Let’s think of other reasons why audio books might be helpful to students with disabilities.

Using Computers instead of hand-writing assignments

“Why do you think using computers instead of having to hand-write your work might be helpful?

What types of disabilities might be helped by using computers instead of hand-written work?” (If you need probes, you might ask, “Does anyone know about speech to text software for computers? What disabilities might be helped by using speech to text software so that a computer could write for you?” to prompt vision loss or limited mobility; or Can you think of any other assistive technology for computers that might help someone with a disability who has problems with hand-written work?” to prompt responses such as track balls, one-handed keyboards, slowing down the speed of the cursor, sticky keys, etc. to prompt limited mobility, tremors, or spasticity in the hands.)

Let’s think of other reasons why using computers instead of using handwritten work might be helpful to students with disabilities.

Extended Time on Tests

“Why do you think extended time for taking a test might be helpful?”

What disabilities might be helped by extended time on tests?” (If you need a probe, you might ask, “What assistive technology might take more time to complete the test” to prompt magnification software or using a CCTV to both read the test and to write answers under magnification; or “Can you think of a reason why the test might have to be read to the student?” to prompt learning disability, dyslexia, blindness, etc.; or “Can you think of a reason why the student might need someone to write the answers to the test?” to prompt limited use of hands, spasticity, tremors, etc.; or “What if someone can’t see to read the test but also can’t hear the test being read aloud?” to prompt the need for a tactile interpreter and someone to write the answers for a Deaf-Blind student.)

Let’s think of other reasons why extended time on tests might be helpful to students with disabilities.

Activity 1B: “Take 3 Steps”

Time: 10 – 15 minutes
Facilitator Script
: “When you need help in college, you should ask yourself the following 3 questions:

  • Why am I having problems or difficulties with my college or vocational classes?
  • What accommodation might help me with the problems I am having?
  • How will that accommodation help me with my college or vocational classes?

“You will need to answer these Why, What and How questions so that you can explain these 3 things to your teacher when you ask for an accommodation.”

“Let’s think of some accommodations that you might need in college. We will practice asking these 3 questions just as you would in preparing to ask your teacher for what you need.” As students volunteer an accommodation they might need, practice answering the 3 questions as a group to see if everyone thinks the answers are complete enough for a teacher to understand what you need to be successful in college.”

Activity 1C: “My Story Videos”

Time: 15 minutes or more

Facilitator Note: Using each of the following My Story videos, show the video and then ask the follow-up questions for that video. Since the videos range in length from a little over 7 minutes to just slightly under 10 minutes, plan to show them one at a time over multiple sessions and allow follow-up time for group discussion.

Source: New England ADA Center – Video Series – “Succeeding in College and Work, Students with Disabilities Tell Their Stories”

My Story—Valeska

Valeska Video
When Valeska was just three years old, her parents were told that she would never go to college. Valeska did struggle in school, but after many years of dropping in and out of school, Valeska found her way. As an older student with learning disabilities, she shares her strategies for success. Watch Valeska’s story. (9:34)

Link: newenglandada.org/videos/succeeding-college-and-work-students-disabilities-tell-their-stories-valeska

Facilitator Questions:

  • What kind of assistance did Valeska need?
  • What kind of assistance did Valeska give to others?

My Story—Santara

Santara Video
A college student with spina bifida explains the process of negotiating classroom accommodations that make the difference in her achieving academic success. (7:48)

Link: newenglandada.org/videos/succeeding-college-and-work-students-disabilities-tell-their-stories-santara

Facilitator Questions:

  • What kind of assistance did Santara need?
  • What advice did Santara give to others?

My Story— Alexander

Alexander Video
As an infant, Alexander developed a visual impairment. Alexander tells a story about how he covered up his disability all the way to junior high. When his ‘cover up’ was discovered by his teacher – it changed his life. Alexander is currently an engineer at Mathworks. (7:12)

Link: newenglandada.org/videos/succeeding-college-and-work-students-disabilities-tell-their-stories-alexander

Facilitator Questions:

  • What kind of assistance did Alexander need?
  • Have you ever felt like Alexander did when he tried to hide his difficulty with reading books? If so, why did you feel the way you did?

My Story— Danielle

Danielle Video
Danielle always wanted to be a nurse. While in nursing school, she is told by the Dean of Nursing she cannot become a nurse because she is missing her right hand. Watch Danielle find ways to negotiate an accommodation, succeed in nursing school, and land a job as a pediatric nurse. (9:42)

Link: newenglandada.org/videos/succeeding-college-and-work-students-disabilities-tell-their-stories-danielle

Facilitator Questions:

  • What kind of assistance did Danielle need?
  • Did Danielle give some advice that you feel you could use? If so, what was that advice?
  • How did you feel about what happened to Danielle when her ability to become a nurse was questioned?

Facilitator Note: “Now that we have seen the My Story videos and we have talked About Valeska, Santara, Alexander and Danielle, let’s think about our own stories. What’s your story? Take a little time to think about that, and then let’s share your story with the group.” (If you need prompts, you might ask, “What kind of assistance have you needed in school?” or “Have you disclosed about a disability, and how did you do that?” or “Have you had to try to hide your disability?” or “Have you had something happen to you because of your disability and you felt that what happened was unfair?

Activity #2: Art Projects & Musical Expression

Art Projects

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by art activities, such as drawing, painting, collages, murals, etc., you might use art materials to do the following. Please keep in mind the age of your students as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group. If members of your group have difficulty manipulating art materials, such as students who have difficulty using scissors due to limited hand dexterity, consider working in partners or small groups.

If your group is made up of students with varying levels of vision loss, consider having students with low vision work as partners or in small groups with students with total vision loss. Using materials such as magazines, advertising flyers, brochures, pamphlets, etc., have the students with low vision audio describe the pictures and words that the partners or small groups might decide to use in a collage or mural.

If your group is made up of students with total vision loss, consider using the Musical Expression activity with your group.

Activity 2A: “When Do I Need an Accommodation?”

Time: 10 minutes or more
Facilitator Note (Materials):
Use large pieces of drawing paper and any art materials you like.

Facilitator Script:
“Students need accommodations at different times in the learning process. For example, some students need an accommodation:

  • outside of the classroom when they are studying or doing assignments;
  • in the classroom when they are getting information and participating with the class; or
  • when they are taking a test.

When do you need an accommodation? Or, do you need an accommodation at more than one time during school? If so, choose one of the times when you need an accommodation, and make a picture of yourself using that accommodation when you would need it. When I call time, we will get back together to share our artwork. Each of you can tell about the time when you will need an accommodation and the accommodation you chose for yourself.”

Facilitator Note: Following the work time, state, “Now let’s share with the group what accommodations you thought of to help you.”

Musical Expression

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by musical expression, you might want to use activities such as singing, simple musical instruments, percussion instruments, drumming, etc. The activity of drumming can be done using plastic buckets or containers, or using hands on tabletops. Please keep in mind the age of your students as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group.

Activity 2B: “Accommodations 1, 2, 3”

Time: 10 minutes or more
Facilitator Script:
“Students need accommodations at different times in the learning process. For example, some students need an accommodation:

  • outside of the classroom when they are studying or doing assignments;
  • in the classroom when they are getting information and participating with the class; or
  • when they are taking a test.

Facilitator Note: This musical expression activity follows a Call and Response format. Using any object as the “Musical Wand,” each person in the circle or group can only “perform” when that person has possession of the Musical Wand. The first person with the Musical Wand calls out (musically) one of the three times named above when a student might need an accommodation. For example:

“Accommodation #1—Doing My Homework” or

“Accommodation #2—Being in Class” or

Accommodation #3—Taking a Test”

When the first person sings out one of these 3 times when an accommodation is needed, the Musical Wand is immediately passed to anyone else in the group, and the person who receives the Musical Wand has to sing out an accommodation that would work, such as the following:

“Accommodation #1—I need audio books to do my homework.” Or

“Accommodation #2—I need a sign language interpreter in the classroom. Or

“Accommodation #3—I need extra time for taking a test.”

The one ground rule is that everything must be in a musical form, and each call and response from everyone in the group must begin with Accommodation #1, 2 or 3.

Activity #3 Dramatic Arts

Facilitator Note: If your group is especially engaged by dramatic arts, such as role plays, skits, improvisation, etc., you might use dramatic arts activities.

Activity 3A: “Take Three Steps”

Time: 10—15 minutes

Facilitator Note: Have the group divide into teams of two people. Give the following directions: “In teams of two people, each of you will take a turn at being the student asking for an accommodation, and your partner will be the teacher. We will use the three steps to state why, what and how about the accommodation you will need. If you are the teacher in the role play, ask about anything that is not clear to you about the requested accommodation or anything else you want to know from your student. When I call “switch places,” you will trade and the other person is now the student and you are the teacher. After we have had a chance to practice both roles, we will share your skit with the group. You can decide with your partner which role you want each of you to take. The group will then decide the why, what and how steps you used in your skit.”

Activity 3B: Self-Advocacy Skills – “The Great Debate”

Time: 5—15 minutes

Facilitator Note: If you used this activity previously in Module 2, but you feel that your group still needs practice with communicating in an assertive style rather than with a passive or aggressive style, use this activity as before. However, be sure to change the debate topics. Some topics of debate might be Summer vs. Winter, Chocolate vs. Strawberry, Halloween vs. Fourth of July, or any other topics to debate that one is better than the other. Give each member of the pair 30 seconds to argue the case for one over the other in one of the three communication styles, and then call “switch” and the other partner gets 30 seconds to make a case. Mix up the topics and the communication styles as each pair gets a turn in front of the group. The group might also have suggestions for new topics to be debated.

 

Activity 3C: Self-Advocacy Skills – “Take A Stand & Deliver”

Time: 10—15 minutes

Facilitator Note: Use the walls of your room to post either “Agree” and Disagree” on opposite walls, or, if you think your group is ready for a more complex task, also post “Strongly Agree” and “Strongly Disagree” on the other two opposite walls. Be sure to audio describe the exact locations for each of these choices so that all of your students will be well oriented.

Facilitator Script: “I am going to read a statement. You will decide if you agree or disagree with the statement (or if you strongly agree, agree, disagree, or strongly disagree with the statement). When I call “Take a Stand,” move to the wall that says how you feel about the statement. Then we will take turns sharing why we chose what we did when I say “Declare.”
(If your group is large, you might want to have a few members at each wall give their reasons for their choice rather than each member.)

Use statements such as the following:

  • When parts in movies or on television are people with disabilities, only actors that really have that disability should get that part, but not actors without disabilities—only actors with disabilities can play people with disabilities.
  • All public transportation should be free for people with disabilities.
  • Only a person with the same disability as you can understand your disability. People without disabilities cannot understand at all.

After each group that has taken a stand at one wall and has shared their reasons during the “Declare” time, ask, “After hearing their reasons for (agreeing/disagreeing, etc.), does anyone want to trade sides and go over to their side?’ Allow group members to switch to a new answer if they become convinced by the other group’s reasons. Try to give each member of the group an opportunity to advocate at least once for the stand they have taken by declaring their reasons for choosing that stand.

Activity#4 Role Models

Facilitator Note: For young people with disabilities, it is very important to identify with role models who are people with disabilities living independently in the community. Sources for finding role models that may serve as guest speakers in class include:

Activity 4A: “And Now, A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5 – 15 minutes
Facilitator Note
: Invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 to 4 people with disabilities to briefly share about an accommodation they needed in college. Using the three steps from the Take Three Steps activity, ask each person to share:

  • Why they were having difficulty?
  • What accommodation did they need?
  • How did it help each of them?

Allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

Activity 4B: Virtual Reality—”A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5 – 15 minutes

Facilitator Note: Using Zoom or a similar platform, invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 to 4 people with disabilities to briefly share about an accommodation they needed in college or vocational school. Using the three steps from the Take Three Steps activity, ask each person to share:

  • Why they were having difficulty?
  • What accommodation did they need?
  • How did it help each of them?

Then allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

 

 

SECTION 7: Handouts or Materials Needed

  • Audiovisual equipment for PowerPoint presentation and/or videos.
  • Art materials, blank paper, colored pencils or markers.
  • Photocopies of PowerPoint slides, including alternate formats such as large print, Braille, and electronic formats such as a USB drive for students with visual or print disabilities.

SECTION 8: After Class

Homework Possibilities

Contact the Disability Services Office at a local college to learn more about the process for requesting reasonable accommodations at the college. Write a one-page paper that identifies the person you talked with, a short description of the process. During the next class next session, present the information to the class.

Facilitator Note: We suggest contacting several Disability Services Offices at local colleges to make them aware of this activity. It is best to identify one person at each DSO who would be willing to talk with the students.

 

 

Quiz Questions

Use these quiz questions to reinforce learning by giving this pop quiz at the end of class, as a homework assignment, or at the beginning of the next class session. Correct answers are noted with an asterisk (*).

  1. The same laws that helped me in high school are used by colleges.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. I have the same rights as anybody else to go as far as my abilities can take me.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. I have to disclose my disability in order to get accommodations in college.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. I am required by law to tell my college that I have a disability.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. Accommodations in college can help me be successful.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Getting an accommodation in college means I don’t have to do all the work assigned to me.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. My college must give me an accommodation in a class even if it changes the learning objectives of the class.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. There are college programs that will allow me to go to college even if I did not earn a high school diploma.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Think College is a program that helps students learn about opportunities to go to college.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Vocational Rehabilitation can help me get things I need to be successful in college.
  • Yes*
  • No

SECTION 9: Resources for Students

Additional Reading and Videos

Fact Sheet: An Overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/ADA-overview

Video – Overview of the ADA
Source: ADA National Network and New England ADA Center

Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ns7UY8HdPr8 (6:41 minutes)

Video: ADA Signing Ceremony (22 minutes)
Source:
U.S. Department of Justice
Link:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gsGiszvyjQ

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/guide/ada-national-network-disability-law-handbook

Americans with Disabilities Act Information Center

ADA National Network

Phone: 1-800-949-4232 (toll free)

Website: adata.org

Facebook: facebook.com/adanetwork

Twitter: twitter.com/ADANational

National Resources

Community Organizations

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