Links module 2

SECTION 2: Strategies for Customization

Adapting and Making Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

The following resources provide guidance on working with students with a variety of disabilities. The resources provide information about adaptations that can be made to instructional techniques and accommodations that can be provided to increase inclusion in the classroom.

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching
Link: cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/disabilities/

Successful Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities
Source: Learning Disabilities Association of America
Link: ldaamerica.org/successful-strategies-for-teaching-students-with-learning-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/teaching/topics/inclusive-teaching/teaching-students-with-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: University of Rochester
Link: www.rochester.edu/college/teaching/teaching-guidance/students-with-disabilities.html

Etiquette for Working with Students with Disabilities
Source: Best Colleges
Link: www.bestcolleges.com/resources/disability-etiquette/

Students with Disabilities in the College Classroom
Source: HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center
Link: www.heath.gwu.edu/students-disabilities-college-classroom

College for Students with Disabilities: A Guide for Students, Families, and Educators
Source: Maryville University
Link: online.maryville.edu/disabilities-guide/

Tips for Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: The University of Wyoming — University Disability Support Services
Link: www.uwyo.edu/wind/echo  OR  www.uwyo.edu/wind/index.html

Invisible Disabilities and Postsecondary Education
Source: DO IT Center, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/invisible-disabilities-and-postsecondary-education
Related Video – Captioned and Audio Described (18:44 minutes)
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/videos/index.php?vid=36

How to Teach and Accommodate
Source: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Link: www.umassd.edu/dss/resources/faculty-staff/how-to-teach-and-accommodate/

23 Ways to Communicate with a Non-Verbal Child
Source: Special Needs Resources
Link: www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2013/04/16/23-ways-to-communicate-with-a-non-verbal-child/

Instructional Strategies
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies

At a Glance: Classroom Accommodations for Nonverbal Learning Disabilities
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies/at-a-glance-classroom-accommodations-for-nonverbal-learning-disabilities

Customizing the Lesson Using Presentation Material and Interactive Exercises

There are three sets of resources provided that can be woven together to customize the learning experience, depending on your goals as a facilitator for this lesson on Disclosure, Self-Identification, and Discussing Your Disability (e.g., providing a very simple introduction versus teaching the basics as a platform for having students engage in deeper learning about complex examples). These include: (1) advance preparation material that students can review; (2) a set of PowerPoint slides that can be used in a presentation and discussion format; and (3) a set of interactive exercises to stimulate applied learning, creativity, and deeper thinking about the concepts.

1.    Advance Preparation Material for Students

This lesson provides a very simple, high-level overview of Disclosure Decisions and Talking About Disability. The goal is to introduce students to the idea of self-advocacy and the concept of how and when to disclose a disability on the job or in college. Suggested resources for advance preparation include readings and videos about the ADA and disclosure.

As noted, these materials can be provided in advance to students, or if the class session is long enough, they may be used in class prior to presenting the PowerPoint slides and getting into a specific discussion of the ADA. Alternatively, they could be used as both advance preparation (pre-homework) and repeated in class to reinforce the learning.

2.   PowerPoint Slides

The PowerPoint slides can be used in class to provide an overview of Disclosure Decisions and Talking About My Disability. Combined with the interactive exercises, the presentation can be extended to cover a long class session or multiple smaller class sessions. The slides can also be presented on their own as part of a short lesson on the Disclosure Decisions and Talking About My Disability.

3.   Interactive Exercises

Several interactive exercises are provided to engage the students in considering specific examples that relate to the material – Disclosure Decisions and Talking About My Disability. For example, while the presentation material explains that the ADA ensures equal access in the community, an interactive exercise leads the students to consider ways that they can successfully disclose their disability and need for accommodations on the job. Therefore, the exercise provides a concrete lesson on disclosing disability and explains how the ADA applies to employers and colleges. These exercises and examples may reflect actual student experiences. The facilitators can ask students to share these experiences to provide variations on those provided in these materials.

SECTION 3: Suggested Advance Preparation for Facilitators

Readings

Fact Sheet: Postsecondary Institutions and Students with Disabilities
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/sites/adata.org/files/files/ADANN_PostSecondary_2016.pdf

Auxiliary Aids and Services for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities
Source: U.S. Department of Education
Link: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

ADA Q & A: Section 504 & Postsecondary Education
Source: The Pacer Center
Link: www.pacer.org/publications/adaqa/504.asp

Resource Sheet: Higher Education and Students with Disabilities
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link: adalive.org/resources/episode-11-resources/

Fact Sheet: Job Applicants and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Link: www.eeoc.gov/facts/jobapplicant.html

Youth, Disclosure, and the Workplace Why, When, What, and How
Source: U.S. Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP)
Link: www.dol.gov/odep/pubs/fact/ydw.htm

Advising Youth with Disabilities on Disclosure: Tips for Service Providers
Source: U.S. Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP)
Link: ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/handle/1813/76640/Advising_Youth_With_Disabilities_on_Disclosure_Tips_for_the_.pdf

Disability Disclosure and Employment – JAN Effective Accommodation Practices Series
Source: The Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/articles/EAPS/loader.cfm?csModule=security/getfile&pageid=480634&searchID=4408531&pageNum=1

Disability Disclosure and Interviewing Techniques for Persons with Disabilities – JAN Consultants’ Corner
Source: The Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/corner/vol01iss13.htm

Dos and Don’ts of Disclosure – JAN Effective Accommodation Practices Series
Source: The Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/articles/Dos-and-Don-ts-of-Disclosure.cfm

Workbooks

The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities
Source:
National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/publications/the-411-on-disability-disclosure-a-workbook-for-youth-with-disabilities/

The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Families, Educators, Youth Service Professionals, and Adult Allies Who Care About Youth with Disabilities
Source:
National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.heath.gwu.edu/sites/g/files/zaxdzs2346/f/downloads/the_411_on_disability_disclosure_for_adults.pdf

Cyber Disclosure for Youth with Disabilities
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/cyber-disclosure

Media

ADA Live! Episode 11: Higher Education and Students with Disabilities (August 6, 2014)
Audio/MP3 file, captioned version and transcript available.
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Podcast Link: adalive.org/episodes/episode-11/
Resource List: adalive.org/resources/episode-11-resources/

Web Course

Foundations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Web Course (Southeast ADA Center)
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link:
bit.ly/foundations-ada-course

The ADA Foundations (bit.ly/foundations-ada-course) is a comprehensive web course designed to increase your knowledge and understanding of the core concepts about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). The web course has been developed to help you learn about the important concepts of the ADA and to think about inclusive solutions for people with disabilities in the workplace, state and local government programs, and private businesses.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this web course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the ADA using a civil rights framework.
  • Identify the five titles of the ADA.
  • Provide a basic overview of each title of the ADA.
  • Define the general nondiscrimination requirements of the ADA.
  • Explain each nondiscrimination requirement using 1-2 real-life examples.
  • Identify the defenses or limitations of each nondiscrimination requirement.
  • Identify the federal agencies responsible for enforcing each title of the ADA.
  • Locate and use resources for information on the ADA.

SECTION 4: Suggested Advance Preparation for Students

The following advanced reading assignments and video excerpts can be assigned to students to prepare them for learning about Disclosure, Self-Identification, and Discussing Your Disability

Readings

Fact Sheet: Postsecondary Institutions and Students with Disabilities
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/sites/adata.org/files/files/ADANN_PostSecondary_2016.pdf

ADA Q & A: Section 504 & Postsecondary Education
Source: The Pacer Center
Link: www.pacer.org/publications/adaqa/504.asp

Fact Sheet: Job Applicants and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Link: www.eeoc.gov/facts/jobapplicant.html

Youth, Disclosure, and the Workplace Why, When, What, and How
Source: U.S. Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP)
Link: www.dol.gov/odep/pubs/fact/ydw.htm

Disability Disclosure and Employment – JAN Effective Accommodation Practices Series
Source: The Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/articles/EAPS/loader.cfm?csModule=security/getfile&pageid=480634&searchID=4408531&pageNum=1

Disability Disclosure and Interviewing Techniques for Persons with Disabilities – JAN Consultants’ Corner
Source: The Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/corner/vol01iss13.htm

Dos and Don’ts of Disclosure – JAN Effective Accommodation Practices Series
Source: The Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/articles/Dos-and-Don-ts-of-Disclosure.cfm

Disability Disclosure
Source:
Project Ten – Transition Education Network
Link: project10.info/DPage.php?ID=136

Workbooks

The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities
Source:
National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/publications/the-411-on-disability-disclosure-a-workbook-for-youth-with-disabilities/

Cyber Disclosure for Youth with Disabilities
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/cyber-disclosure

Web Course

Foundations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Web Course (Southeast ADA Center)
Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link:
bit.ly/foundations-ada-course

The ADA Foundations (bit.ly/foundations-ada-course) is a comprehensive web course designed to increase your knowledge and understanding of the core concepts about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). The web course has been developed to help you learn about the important concepts of the ADA and to think about inclusive solutions for people with disabilities in the workplace, state and local government programs, and private businesses.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this web course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the ADA using a civil rights framework.
  • Identify the five titles of the ADA.
  • Provide a basic overview of each title of the ADA.
  • Define the general nondiscrimination requirements of the ADA.
  • Explain each nondiscrimination requirement using 1-2 real-life examples.
  • Identify the defenses or limitations of each nondiscrimination requirement.
  • Identify the federal agencies responsible for enforcing each title of the ADA.

Locate and use resources for information on the ADA.

 

SECTION 5: Presentation

Pre-Module for the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: Let’s think of people who have disabilities. These could be people in movies, on television, on the internet, or in social media.

Who are some of the people you can think of? (List the names on the left side of a whiteboard or flip chart.)

Now, let’s think of what types of things each person we named might have difficulty doing because of their disability. (Add this list across from each name in the middle of the whiteboard or flip chart.)

Finally, let’s think of what might help each person to do what is difficult for them to do. (Add this in a list across from each name and on the right side of the whiteboard or flip chart.)

Save this information for a post-module activity. You may want to save it on a computer or tablet to project the list after completing this module.

Today we are going to learn about self-identifying as a person with a disability and talking with others about our disability.

Facilitator Note

Use the Module 2 PowerPoint slides, Pathways to Careers… Disclosure Decisions and Talking About My Disability

Listed below are some websites that may assist with identifying people with disabilities. We suggest reviewing these lists in advance to ensure that you are familiar with the information and can use it to encourage students to share.

Famous people with disabilities (Girls Health.Gov)
Link: www.girlshealth.gov/disability/fun/famous.html

Famous People With Disabilities (Center for Disability Information & Referral)
Link: www.iup.edu/disabilitysupport/files/_disability_support/resources_for_faculty_and_staff_members/notable-people-with-disabilities.pdf

Famous People with Disabilities (Disabled World)
Link: www.disabled-world.com/artman/publish/article_0060.shtml

Module 2 PowerPoint slides, Pathways to Careers… Disclosure Decisions and Talking About My Disability

Slide 1 – Pathways to Careers…. Disclosure Decisions and Talking About My Disability

Slide 1 Notes – Pathways to Careers…. Disclosure Decisions and Talking About My Disability

Objective: Students will be introduced to the topic of how and when to disclose and talk about their disability.

 

 

Slide 2 – Decisions

Slide 2 Notes – Decisions?
Objective: Students will explore conscious and unconscious decision making in their own life.
Facilitator Talking Points:
Every day we make decisions. Most of the decisions we make are little ones. What do I want to wear to school? Where do I want to go eat? Should I go to the mall or to the party Friday night? These are pretty simple decisions. We often don’t realize we are making a decision.

Some decisions are middle-sized: Should I visit a friend, or just go straight home? Which comes first: TV or homework?

But every once in a while, we have to make a “big” decision. Who should I marry? Should I accept this job offer? Should I go to college? Where should I live?

People who study decision-making say we make over 35,000 decisions every day! When we make big decisions, we have to think about the good things and not so good things could come from our decision.

Discussion: What are some decisions you make every day? What kind of “big decisions” have you made? How did you make them?

Slide 3 – Should I Tell Someone That I Have a Disability?

Slide 3 Notes – – Should I Tell Someone That I Have a Disability?

Objective: Students will be introduced to the idea that disclosure of disability is an important decision that should be carefully thought out.

Facilitator Talking Points:

One of the biggest decisions you will ever make is whether or not you should tell someone you have a disability. You are never required to tell anyone anything about your disability.

It doesn’t matter how obvious your disability is, you still need to think about how and when to tell someone you have a disability or if you want to tell anyone at all. The most important thing to remember is that you decide if you want to tell someone about your disability. You also get to decide how much information to share.

In the next few slides we will learn about how the ADA can help us with this decision.

Slide 4 – Should I Tell an Employer That I Have a Disability?

Slide 4 Notes – Should I Tell an Employer That I Have a Disability?

Objective: Students will gain an understanding of disclosure and the ADA ‘s rules about it.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Sometimes our disabilities are easy to spot. At other times, disabilities are not easy to see. It is easy to spot someone who uses a wheelchair. It is easy to see they will have trouble reaching items that are high on a shelf or will need a ramp to get into a building. It is a lot harder to spot someone who has a learning disability or a mental illness. These disabilities may not be obvious. Yes, the person but may still need help to do their job or get help with a class they are taking.

The ADA says you never have to tell an employer or a teacher you have a disability. However, it also says that in order to get help with something, you do need to tell them you have a disability. Telling someone you have a disability is called “disclosure.”

If you decide to disclose (or tell someone about) your disability, it is important to remember that you only need to talk about two things. First, how does your disability make it difficult to do something? And second, what help do you need to do your job or go to school?

Slide 5 – Disclosure – Yes or No?

Slide 5 Notes – Disclosure – Yes or No?

Objective: The student will learn tips for making a decision about disclosing his/her disability.

Facilitator Talking Points:

If you decide to disclose (or tell someone about) your disability, it is important to remember that you only need to talk about two things.

First, how does your disability make it difficult to do something?

And second, what help do you need to do your job or go to school?

Here are a couple of examples.

  • Example 1: Juan has a disability that causes difficulty in concentration. He takes a medication that helps him to concentrate. It takes about 2 hours for it to begin to help him. He has requested that his workday start at 9:00 AM, instead of 8:00 AM, since he has to take his medication at 7:00 AM with breakfast.

    In this example, Juan’s disability make it difficult to concentrate and he has to take medication. He needs to start his workday at 9:00 AM instead of 8:00 AM so that he can concentrate better.

  • Example 2: Aisha is Deaf. She is unable to understand spoken conversation in group meetings. She needs an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter to communicate with her co-workers and fully participate in the meetings.

    In this example, Aisha’s disability is being Deaf and unable to hear. She needs an ASL interpreter help her communicate in group meetings on her job.

Note: As a facilitator, you may use other examples that are relevant to your group.

Slide 6 – Disclosure Tips (Telling Someone About Your Disability)

Slide 6 Notes – Disclosure Tips (Telling Someone About Your Disability)

Objective: The student will learn tips for making a decision about disclosing his/her disability.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Making a decision is hard. Here are some things you can do to help you make a big decision.

  • Write down the good things that might happen if you disclose your disability. Examples: Your boss may agree to give you a written list of what she wants you to do so that you won’t forget something. You may be accepted at a college that is looking for students with different experiences.
  • Write down the risks you might have if you disclose your disability.
    Examples: Someone may make a judgment about who you are and what you can do. A potential employer may choose not to interview you.
  • Talk to someone you trust. We seldom make decisions without help. A mechanic can help us decide about fixing a car. A doctor might help with health decisions. Our parents, a teacher, a counselor, other people with disabilities, or someone else you respect and trust can help you make a good decision.
  • Write out the things you want to say when you talk about your disability. You may want to write down your ideas or an outline of what you want to say about your disability. This will help you focus on the important things that you want to disclose.
  • Most of all, take your time! Remember, it is your decision what you to tell your boss or teacher about your disability.

Slide 7 – The ADA Gives You the Right to Ask for Help

Slide 7 Notes – The ADA Gives You the Right to Ask for Help

Objective: Students will understand how the ADA helps when disclosing a disability and when asking for an accommodation.

Facilitator Talking Points:

The ADA protects us when we are looking for a job or when we have a job. Employers can’t refuse to give you an interview just because you have a disability. You need to have the skills or experience the job requires. The ADA also says that you have the right to ask for accommodations all through the application and interview process—and after you are hired for the job. If you need help with an application, you can ask to complete it in another way that works for you. If you need help with an interview, you can ask someone you trust (such as your teacher or vocational rehabilitation counselor) to come with you. The ADA also says that employers can’t make you take special tests or medical examinations unless everybody applying for the job has to take them.

Most importantly, once you are hired, if you find that your disability makes it hard to do parts of your job, the ADA says that you can ask for help. This help is called an “accommodation.” An employer may not know you need an accommodation. That is why it is important for you to disclose (or tell about) your disability.

Here are some examples of accommodations people might need to do their job:

  • Someone who is blind or has low vision may need a screen reader or other technology to work at a computer. The person may need to have some things labeled for them in Braille or large print.
  • Someone who is D/deaf or is hard of hearing may need a sign language interpreter at the interview or staff meeting.
  • Someone who has a psychiatric disability may need additional breaks or a place to get away for a few minutes when they have a lot of stress on the job.
  • Someone with an intellectual disability may need to have work supplies identified by different colors or they may need instructions given a little bit at a time.

 

 

Slide 8 – How Should I Ask My Boss for Help?

Slide 8 Notes – How Should I Ask My Boss for Help?

Objective: Students will understand how the ADA helps in disclosing disability in asking for an accommodation.

Facilitator Talking Points:

In school, you probably already get help with things that are hard for you. There are laws that ensure you get a good education based on what you do well and provide support for areas where you might need help. The accommodations you get in school have already been set up for you. After high school, laws like the ADA can protect your rights but you also have more responsibility. One of your biggest responsibilities is to ask for help when you need it.

Accommodations, like the ones we talked about in the last slide, are not automatic. You have to ask for an accommodation. To get an accommodation, you will need to disclose your disability. There are several ways that you can disclose your disability. You can disclose in any way that is comfortable for you. Some people prefer to have a conversation with their boss. Other people prefer to write an email or a note. You can even ask a job coach or someone else to disclose for you. The ADA says you get to choose how you disclose. When you choose to disclose your disability, the ADA says that the information must be kept confidential between you and your boss.

Employers also have rights and responsibilities. During an interview, an employer can’t ask you questions about your disability. However, an employer can ask you to tell or show them how you would perform a work task. After you are hired and are asking for an accommodation, your boss can ask how your disability affects you, how it might make it difficult to do part of your job, and what you might need to do it well. Employers don’t need to know all of the details about your disability. They don’t even need to know what your disability is called. However, they do have the right to get a letter from a health care provider telling them how your disability affects some of your work tasks. Again, the information employers receive must be kept confidential.

Employers also have the right to make the final decision about what accommodation you get as long as it helps you do your job. Above all, employers have the responsibility to listen to you and work with you to come up with a solution that will work for you.

 

 

Slide 9– Talking About Your Disability With Your Employer

Slide 9 Notes – Talking About Your Disability With Your Employer

Objective: Students will learn about strategies to use when talking about their disability to an employer.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Let’s talk about some tips for disclosing your disability.

  • You know you can do the job, so be confident and be positive. You can do this! Don’t let anybody tell you that you can’t!
  • It is important to focus on what you do well and highlight your strengths.
  • Be specific in explaining how your disability affects your ability to do some things. You don’t need to say what your disability is. In fact, avoid using labels like mental illness or cerebral palsy. Employers may have ideas about certain disabilities that may not be true about you!
  • Talk about where your disability is a challenge and offer suggestions about what has worked in the past.
  • Have an open mind about trying something new. There may be something you never thought of that can help you.

Slide 10– How Can Knowing About the ADA Help Me at School?

Slide 10 Notes – How Can Knowing About the ADA Help Me at School?

Objective: Students will understand how the ADA works in a post-secondary school environment.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Have you decided to go to college? That is a big decision! You might be worried about doing the work. Should you go full-time or part-time? These are big things to consider. You are growing up and taking on new responsibilities.

One big responsibility is disclosing your disability in order to get accommodations at school. Unlike high school where teachers already knew you had a disability, you need to disclose your disability and ask for accommodations. Just like work, school accommodations are not automatic.

Colleges and Universities have Disability Services Offices or staff. Disability Services staff can help you. They can work with your teachers to make sure you get accommodations you need. But they won’t come to find you and ask if you need help. You have to go to them and ask for help.

Even if your disability is obvious, you still need to disclose your disability to get help from Disability Services. It could be that you won’t need any accommodations. If you do find that you need some help, you have to go to your school’s Disability Services Office and request it.

It is important to ask for help as soon as you realize that you need it. For example, if you are struggling in a class because of your learning disability, request help as soon as the difficulties begin.

Slide 11– Social Media and Disclosure

Slide 11 Notes – Social Media and Disclosure

Objective: Students will learn about how what they post on social media might accidentally disclose a disability.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Social media has completely changed how we talk with our friends. I bet you have an Instagram account, or Snapchat, or maybe you have a Facebook account. Social media is fun. We keep up with our friends and share pictures. We post things that are important to us or make us laugh but posting on social media does have risks that we need to think about. Maybe we post a picture or make a comment that really should have been kept private. We may post something about our disability. This information is now on the internet for anybody to see, even strangers. A future employer might see what you have posted and decide to not give you a chance based on what they see. We need to be careful what we put online. Is it something we really want people who don’t know us to see?

Post Module for the Training Facilitator:

Post-Module Facilitator Note: After you have completed the PowerPoint and learning activities, summarize the session(s) with the group.

From the Pre-Module activity, put the 3-column chart back up and see what the group would like to add to the 3 lists.

What did we learn about disclosing a disability and accommodations that can help in school or at work? Can we think of more names (people with disabilities) to add to our list? Can we think of other things that might be difficult for each person on our list? Finally, can we think of other accommodations that would help each person to do what is difficult for them? Do we have any accommodation on our list that would be helpful for you? If so, how would that accommodation be useful for you?

 

 

SECTION 6: Learning Activities

 

For the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: Learning activities have been designed to reinforce the content from the PowerPoint presentation and/or videos. A menu of activities has been provided. You may choose one or more activities based upon the time that you have to present the material and upon the needs of the students. For each interactive activity Suggested time frames are included with each activity. Please keep in mind the age of your students, their individual skill levels, and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group.

Activity #1: Group Discussion

Facilitator Note: Please allow time frames for these discussions and activities that are appropriate for the size of the group and the makeup of the group. Please be flexible if the discussion or the sharing is productive, and the participants are actively engaged.

Activity 1A: “Different”

Time: 5 – 10 minutes
Facilitator Script: Can you think of a time when you felt “different”? What was happening at that time, and what do you think made you feel “different” in that situation? Let’s share about these times and why you felt like you were different in that situation.

Facilitator Note: Disclosure of a disability is a personal choice, so emphasize each response as given, but do not probe for responses that focus on disability. Instead, clarify each response in this manner: “Being the only girl on a team with mostly boys could make you feel different. Being the only Latino in a class could make you feel different…Using a wheelchair when getting on a bus could make you feel different.

If no one in your group responds with a disability-related answer, probe with a question such as, “Do you think having a disability could sometimes make you feel “different?”  It is important to accept all responses and validate the thoughts of your group.

Activity 1B: “Young People Share About Disability”
Time:
5 – 15 minutes
Facilitator Note
: Use the PowerPoint entitled “Young People Share About Disability” and the Facilitator’s Notes below for this discussion activity.

Facilitator Script: Today, we are going to look at some slides of young people with disabilities. Some of you may already know who some of these young people are, and you may also know about their disabilities.

Slide 1 – Young People Share About Disability

Slide 1 Notes – Young People Share About Disability

Facilitator Talking Points:
Today, we are going to look at some slides of young people with disabilities. Some of you may already know who some of these young people are, and you may also know about their disabilities.

Slide 2 – Daniel Radcliff

Slide 2 Notes – Daniel Radcliff

Facilitator Talking Points:

Most notable for his role as Harry Potter, Daniel Radcliffe has managed a mild case of dyspraxia all his life. Dyspraxia is a common neurological disorder that affects motor skill development. This means that even the star of one of the largest franchises in movie history still has trouble tying his shoelaces. In an interview regarding his Broadway debut, he once jokingly stated “I sometimes think, why, oh why, has Velcro not taken off?”

Slide 3 – Josh Blue

Slide 3 Notes – Josh Blue

Facilitator Talking Points:

Blue appeared on Last Comic Standing to “make people aware of the fact that people with disabilities can make an impact.” He coined the term “palsy punch” during his final set of the final round of the show, when he said that the palsy punch is effective in a fight because “first of all, they don’t know where the punch is coming from, and second of all, neither do I.” One of Blue’s competitors said he has “an unreasonable amount of likability” while another of his competitors said, “he is just a good guy”.

Slide 4 – British Paraorchestra

Slide 4 Notes – British Paraorchestra

Facilitator Talking Points:

The British Paraorchestra, based in London, is an orchestra consisting entirely of musicians with disabilities—the first ever orchestra of its kind in the United Kingdom. The Paraorchestra was formed by conductor Charles Hazlewood in 2011 as a project to create a platform for the top musicians with disabilities, with the hope that its success would lead to better integration of people with disabilities into music and performing arts. The orchestra received international attention when it played alongside Coldplay during the closing ceremony of the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London in September 2012.

Slide 5 – Rudely Interrupted

Slide 5 Notes – Rudely Interrupted

Facilitator Talking Points:

Formed in 2006 Rudely Interrupted is one of Australia’s truly unique independent rock acts as it strives to challenge people’s thoughts on disability”.

Five out of six members of Rudely Interrupted have a physical or cognitive disability. Lead singer Rory Burnside is blind, has Autism Spectrum Disorder, and has perfect pitch; keyboardist Marcus Stone has Autism Spectrum Disorder and is 80% deaf; bassist Sam Beke has Down Syndrome; drummer Josh Hogan has autism; and percussionist Connie Kirkpatrick has Down Syndrome and is blind. The only member of the group without a disability is guitarist Rohan Brooks, a music therapist who came up with the idea of forming a band made up of some of his students.

Slide 6 – Bethany Hamilton

Slide 6 Notes – Bethany Hamilton

Facilitator Talking Points:

On October 31, 2003, Hamilton, aged 13 at the time, went for a morning surf along Tunnels Beach, Kauai, with best friend Alana Blanchard, Alana’s father, Holt, and brother Byron. She was lying on her surfboard with her left arm dangling in the water, when a 14-foot-long tiger shark attacked her, severing her left arm just below the shoulder. She was rushed to the hospital and by the time she arrived she had lost over 60% of her blood. She spent a week in recovery before being released. One month later Bethany returned to surfing. After teaching herself to surf with one arm she again entered a surfing competition.

On September 7, 2016, Bethany competed in the Swatch Women’s Pro surfing competition. Today Bethany is ranked 19th by the World Surf League Women’s WCT 2016 ranking.

Slide 7 – Michael Phelps

Slide 7 Notes – Michael Phelps

Facilitator Talking Points:

Growing up, champion swimmer Michael Phelps was continually criticized by teachers for his inability to sit still and was formally diagnosed with ADHD when he was in fifth grade. After being on Ritalin for over two years, Phelps chose to stop using the medication and instead used swimming to help him find focus. His choice clearly paid off, as he ended his Olympic career as the most highly decorated Olympian of all time, boasting 22 medals (18 are gold).

What kinds of accommodations do you think have helped each of these young people?

(Facilitator Note: Please allow time frames for these discussions and activities that are appropriate for the size of the group and the nature of the makeup of the group. Please be flexible if the discussion or the sharing is productive, and the participants are actively engaged.)

Activity #2: Art Projects & Musical Expression

Art Projects

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by art activities, such as drawing, painting, collages, murals, etc., you might use art materials to do the following. Please keep in mind the age of your students as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group. If members of your group have difficulty manipulating art materials, such as students who have difficulty using scissors due to limited hand dexterity, consider working in partners or small groups.

If your group is made up of students with varying levels of vision loss, consider having students with low vision work as partners or in small groups with students with total vision loss. Using materials such as magazines, advertising flyers, brochures, pamphlets, etc., have the students with low vision audio describe the pictures and words that the partners or small groups might decide to use in a collage or mural.

If your group is made up of students with total vision loss, consider using the Musical Expression activity with your group.

Activity 2A: “Bumper Stickers”

Time: 10 minutes or more
Facilitator Note (Materials): Use long strips of paper and art materials for this activity. You may also provide magazines advertising flyers, brochures, pamphlets, etc. from which to cut pictures and words, and stickers, if available.

Facilitator Script: Bumper stickers show what someone is proud of and tell something about the person who chose that bumper sticker. Today, we are going to make bumper stickers that tell about you. What would you like to put on your bumper sticker to tell others about you? Think of all the many ways that you could tell about yourself and put on your bumper sticker whatever you want the world to know.

Facilitator Note: Following the work time, state “Let’s share our bumper stickers. What does your bumper sticker tell about you?” As each person shares a bumper sticker, emphasize the different traits that are included, such as gender, race, ethnicity, disability, and so on, as well as things the person likes to do, and so on. Point out that all of the traits are important because they work together to make up who you are.

Musical Expression

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by musical expression, you might want to use activities such as singing, simple musical instruments, percussion instruments, drumming, etc.  The activity of drumming can be done using plastic buckets or containers or using hands on tabletops. Please keep in mind the age of your students as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group.

Activity 2B: “Music About Me”

Time: 10 minutes or more
Facilitator Script: Today, we are going to create songs or music that tell about you. What do you want to tell others about yourself? What do you want the world to know about who you are? What do you like to do?  How can you tell these things about yourself using song or music?  Create your own song or music that tells about you.

Facilitator Note: Following the work time, state “Let’s share our music that we have created to tell about us.” As each person shares, point out the different aspects of what is being shared through the musical expression. Emphasize that all of these are important because they work together to make up who you are.

 

 

Activity #3 Dramatic Arts

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by dramatic arts, such as role plays, skits, improvisation, etc., you may choose to use dramatic arts activities.

Activity 3A: Self-Advocacy Skills—”Communicating with Style!”

Time: 5 to 15 minutes
Facilitator Note: If you can move outdoors to an area such as a parking lot, use hard-boiled eggs for this activity. Otherwise, use small bean bags in front of the group.

Facilitator Script: When we want to get a message across to someone, we can communicate our message in different ways. One style of communicating is passive. What do you think a passive communication might look like? (Reinforce responses such as looking all around or out the window but not looking at the person you are communicating with, using a weak or uncertain tone of voice, changing your mind often or saying things like “I don’t really know.” Or “I’m not sure.”)

Another way to get a message across is with an aggressive style of communication. What do you think an aggressive communication might look like? (Reinforce responses such as using a loud voice, making forceful gestures such as pointing a finger or shaking a fist, using an angry facial expression, or moving into the other person’s space.)

A third way to get a message across is with an assertive communication. What do you think an assertive communication might look like? (Reinforce responses such as using a normal tone of voice, looking at the person you are communicating with, making eye contact, or making a point clearly so that your message is understood.)

Facilitator Note: When you feel that the group has a basic understanding of these three communication styles, choose two people to demonstrate getting a message across to their partner in one of three styles—Passive, Aggressive, or Assertive, and using either a hard-boiled egg or a small bean bag, but with no words. Communicate one of the three styles to the pair without the rest of the group knowing which it is. After the pair has improvised getting the message across, ask the group which style they think that was. What did they see that made them think it was (Passive, Aggressive or Assertive)? Discuss with the group until the group agrees on 1 of these, and then ask the pair to let the group know if this was correct.  Discuss how the pair could have changed their improvisation if the group could not tell which style they were demonstrating.

Finally, ask which communication style the group thinks would be the best choice if you are advocating for something that you need, such as help in being able to do something.  (If you are outside using hard-boiled eggs, be sure to leave time for clean-up at the end of this activity.)

Activity 3B: Self-Advocacy Skills—”Great Debate”

Time: 5 – 15 minutes
Facilitator Note: Use the same strategy as in the Activity 3A: Self-Advocacy Skills—”Communicating with Style!” to make sure your group has a basic understanding of the 3 communication styles of Passive, Aggressive and Assertive.  Then, choose two people at a time to have a one-minute debate in one of the three styles, and using nonsense topics like Dogs vs. Cats, Baseball vs. Soccer, Pies vs. Cakes, etc.  Assign one person in the pair dogs and the other person cats. The student must advocate that dogs are better than cats or cats are better than dogs, while using the communication style you provided. Call time after 30 seconds and the other person has a 30-second opportunity. Change pairs of debaters and topics of debate as time permits. If your group is especially engaged by this activity, they might make suggestions for debate topics.

Finally, ask which communication style the group thinks would be the best choice if you are advocating for something that you need, such as an accommodation to help you in school or at work.

 

 

Activity#4 Role Models

Facilitator Note: For young people with disabilities, it is very important to identify with role models who are people with disabilities living independently in the community. Sources for finding role models that may serve as guest speakers in class include:

Activity 4A: “And Now, A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5 – 15 minutes
Facilitator Note
: Invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 to 4 people with disabilities to briefly share how and why they disclosed as a person with a disability, and what accommodations help them in school or at work. Have the speaker or panel members emphasize that they did not disclose about the nature or extent of their disability, but focused on the difficulties they faced and how the accommodation requested would help them to be successful with school or work. Then allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

Activity 4B: Virtual Reality—”A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5 – 15 minutes
Facilitator Note
: Using Skype, FaceTime, or a similar platform, invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 to 4 people with disabilities to briefly share how and why they disclosed as a person with a disability, and what accommodations help them in school or at work. Have the speaker or panel members emphasize that they did not disclose about the nature or extent of their disability, but focused on the difficulties they faced and how the accommodation requested would help them to be successful with school or work. Then, allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

SECTION 7: Handouts or Materials Needed

  • Audiovisual equipment for PowerPoint presentation and/or videos.
  • Art materials, blank paper, colored pencils or markers.
  • Photocopies of PowerPoint slides, including alternate formats such as large print, Braille, and electronic formats such as a USB drive for students with visual or print disabilities.

SECTION 8: After Class

Homework Possibilities

Let’s think about how to disclose a disability and practice the steps we discussed today.

  1. Make a list of the good things that might happen if you disclose your disability.
  2. Make a list of the risks you might have if you disclose your disability.
  3. Write out the things you want to say when you talk about your disability. Write this list as if you are making plans to discuss the need for a reasonable accommodation with a new boss.

During the next class session, we will review disclosure and discuss your ideas as group.

 

 

Quiz Questions

Use these quiz questions to reinforce learning by giving this pop quiz at the end of class, as a homework assignment, or at the beginning of the next class session. Correct answers are noted with an asterisk (*)

  1. Telling an employer or college staff about my disability is an important decision.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Telling someone about my disability is called disclosure.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Writing down what you want to say when you disclose your disability can be helpful.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. The main reason for disclosing a disability is to ask for an accommodation.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. I should wait to ask for an accommodation until things get really bad for me.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. The ADA has clear instructions for how you can ask for an accommodation.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. It is important that I give my employer or school as much information as I can about my disability.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. My employer must give me an accommodation.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. I can get accommodation help in college at the school’s disability services office.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. If I use social media, I should be careful about what I post.
  • Yes*
  • No

SECTION 9: Resources for Students

Additional Reading and Videos

Fact Sheet: An Overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/ADA-overview

Video – Overview of the ADA
Source: ADA National Network and New England ADA Center

Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ns7UY8HdPr8 (6:41 minutes)

Video: ADA Signing Ceremony (22 minutes)
Source:
U.S. Department of Justice
Link:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gsGiszvyjQ

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/guide/ada-national-network-disability-law-handbook

Americans with Disabilities Act Information Center

ADA National Network

Phone: 1-800-949-4232 (toll free)

Website: adata.org

Facebook: facebook.com/adanetwork

Twitter: twitter.com/ADANational

National Resources

Community Organizations

en_USEnglish
Scroll to Top