Links Module 10

SECTION 2: Strategies for Customization

Adapting and Making Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

The following resources provide guidance on working with students with a variety of disabilities. The resources provide information about adaptations that can be made to instructional techniques and accommodations that can be provided to increase inclusion in the classroom.

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching
Link: cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/disabilities/

Successful Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities
Source: Learning Disabilities Association of America
Link: ldaamerica.org/successful-strategies-for-teaching-students-with-learning-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/teaching/topics/inclusive-teaching/teaching-students-with-disabilities/

Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: University of Rochester
Link: www.rochester.edu/college/teaching/teaching-guidance/students-with-disabilities.html

Etiquette for Working with Students with Disabilities
Source: Best Colleges
Link: www.bestcolleges.com/resources/disability-etiquette/

Students with Disabilities in the College Classroom
Source: HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center
Link: www.heath.gwu.edu/students-disabilities-college-classroom

College for Students with Disabilities: A Guide for Students, Families, and Educators
Source: Maryville University
Link: online.maryville.edu/disabilities-guide/

Tips for Teaching Students with Disabilities
Source: The University of Wyoming — University Disability Support Services
Link: www.uwyo.edu/wind/echo OR www.uwyo.edu/wind/index.html

Invisible Disabilities and Postsecondary Education
Source: DO IT Center, University of Washington
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/invisible-disabilities-and-postsecondary-education
Related Video – Captioned and Audio Described (18:44 minutes)
Link: www.washington.edu/doit/videos/index.php?vid=36

How to Teach and Accommodate
Source: University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Link: www.umassd.edu/dss/resources/faculty-staff/how-to-teach-and-accommodate/

23 Ways to Communicate with a Non-Verbal Child
Source: Special Needs Resources
Link: www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2013/04/16/23-ways-to-communicate-with-a-non-verbal-child/

Instructional Strategies
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies

At a Glance: Classroom Accommodations for Nonverbal Learning Disabilities
Source: Understood: for Learning & Attention Issues
Link: www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies/at-a-glance-classroom-accommodations-for-nonverbal-learning-disabilities

Customizing the Lesson Using Presentation Material and Interactive Exercises

There are three sets of resources provided that can be woven together to customize the learning experience, depending on your goals as an instructor for this lesson on The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Blind or Low Vision (e.g., providing a very simple introduction versus teaching the basics as a platform for having students engage in deeper learning about complex examples). These include: (1) advance preparation material that students can review; (2) a set of PowerPoint slides that can be used in a lecture and discussion format; and (3) a set of interactive exercises to stimulate applied learning, creativity, and deeper thinking about the concepts.

1.    Advance Preparation Material for Students

This lesson provides a very simple, high-level overview of The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Blind or Low Vision. The goal is to introduce students to the idea of the terms “effective communication” and “auxiliary aids and services start students thinking about ways that provide equal access to information and communications in our environment Suggested resources for advance preparation include readings and videos of self-advocacy.

As noted, these materials can be provided in advance to students, or if the class session is long enough, they may be used in class prior to presenting the PowerPoint slides and getting into a specific discussion of self-advocacy. Alternatively, they could be used as both advance preparation (pre-homework) and repeated in class to reinforce the learning.

2.   PowerPoint Slides

The PowerPoint slides can be used in class to provide a more in-depth overview of : The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Blind or Low Vision. Combined with the interactive exercises, the presentation can be extended to cover a long class session or multiple smaller class sessions. The slides can also be presented on their own as part of a short lesson on Advocating for My Rights Under the ADA.

3.   Interactive Exercises

Several interactive exercises are provided to engage the students in considering specific examples that relate to the material “: The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Blind or Low Vision.” For example, while the presentation material explains effective communication and auxiliary aids and services for individuals who are Blind or have low vision, and includes the topics: methods of effective communication in public places, asking for accommodations, the rights of requesting an accommodation, and the public accommodation’s requirement to provide effective communication responsibilities of why it is important. an interactive exercise leads the students to practice how to request accommodations (see interactive exercise #1). Therefore, the exercise provides a concrete lesson on the accommodation process and explains how the ADA is a law that applies to public places.

 

 

SECTION 3: Suggested Advance Preparation for Facilitators

Readings

Facts About the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Link: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/fs-ada.cfm

Revised ADA Requirements: Effective Communication | PDF
Source: Department of Justice
Link: ada.gov/effective-comm

Effective Communication: ADA Title II & III – Fact Sheet Series
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/communication

General Effective Communication Requirements Under Title II of the ADA
Source: ADA Best Practices Tool Kit for State and Local Governments
Link: ada.gov/pcatoolkit/chap3toolkit.htm

What kinds of auxiliary aids and services are required by the ADA to ensure effective communication with individuals with hearing or vision impairments?
Source: ADA National Network FAQs
Link: adata.org/faq/what-kinds-auxiliary-aids-and-services-are-required-ada-ensure-effective-communication

Accommodation Examples
Source: Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/soar/hearing/hearingex.html

Auxiliary Aids and Services for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities
Source: U.S. Department of Education
Link: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

Students with Blindness and Low Vision
Source: Blue Ridge Community College
Link: disabilitynavigator.org/program/54962/vision-impaired-blue-ridge-chapter

Airports Getting Friendlier for Blind Travelers
Source: USA Today
Link: www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/2018/03/14/airports-blind-travelers-augmented-reality/422562002/

Audio Description to Allow the Blind to “See” the Total Eclipse
Source: American Council of the Blind (ACB)
Link: www.pathstoliteracy.org/resource/audio-description-allow-blind-see-total-eclipse/

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook: Communication and the ADA
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/publication/disability-law-handbook#Communication and the ADA

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook: Service Animals and the ADA
Source: ADA National Network
Link: https://adata.org/publication/disability-law-handbook#Service Animals and the ADA

Netflix to Enhance Access for Customers Who Are Blind
Source: American Council of the Blind (ACB)
Link: dralegal.org/featured/netflix-enhance-access-customers-blind/

Questions & Answers about Blindness and Vision Impairments in the Workplace and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Link: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/qa_vision.cfm

Workbook

The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/publications/the-411-on-disability-disclosure-a-workbook-for-youth-with-disabilities/

Websites

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Search for ADA information by topic or type of disability.
Link: www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm

Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Search for information on job accommodations.
Link: askjan.org/media/index.htm

American Council of the Blind
Link: www.acb.org

American Foundation for the Blind
Link: http://www.afb.org

National Federation of the Blind
Link: https://nfb.org/

Media

Disability Inclusion Starts with You (Captioned)
Source: Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP)
Link: www.dol.gov/ofccp/SelfIdVideo.html

ADA Live! Podcasts
ADA Live! is a free monthly show broadcast nationally on the Internet. Learn about your rights and responsibilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Leaders in the field will share their knowledge, experience, and successful strategies that increase the participation of persons with disabilities in communities and businesses. Listen to the archived podcasts or read the episode transcripts. Most episodes include a list of useful of Resources. ADA Live! is produced by the Southeast ADA Center, a member of the ADA National Network and a project of the Burton Blatt Institute (BBI) at Syracuse University.
Source:
Southeast ADA National Center
Link: adalive.org

Web Courses

Foundations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Web Course (Southeast ADA Center)

Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link:
bit.ly/foundations-ada-course

The ADA Foundations (bit.ly/foundations-ada-course) is a comprehensive web course designed to increase your knowledge and understanding of the core concepts about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). The web course has been developed to help you learn about the important concepts of the ADA and to think about inclusive solutions for people with disabilities in the workplace, state and local government programs, and private businesses.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this web course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the ADA using a civil rights framework.
  • Identify the five titles of the ADA.
  • Provide a basic overview of each title of the ADA.
  • Define the general nondiscrimination requirements of the ADA.
  • Explain each nondiscrimination requirement using 1-2 real-life examples.
  • Identify the defenses or limitations of each nondiscrimination requirement.
  • Identify the federal agencies responsible for enforcing each title of the ADA.
  • Locate and use resources for information on the ADA.

 

SECTION 4: Suggested Advance Preparation for Students

The following advanced reading assignments and video excerpts can be assigned to students to prepare them for learning about Effective Communication for People with Hearing Loss.

Readings

Facts About the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Link: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/fs-ada.cfm

Revised ADA Requirements: Effective Communication | PDF
Source: Department of Justice
Link: ada.gov/effective-comm

Effective Communication: ADA Title II & III – Fact Sheet Series
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/communication

General Effective Communication Requirements Under Title II of the ADA
Source: ADA Best Practices Tool Kit for State and Local Governments
Link: ada.gov/pcatoolkit/chap3toolkit.htm

What kinds of auxiliary aids and services are required by the ADA to ensure effective communication with individuals with hearing or vision impairments?
Source: ADA National Network FAQs
Link: adata.org/faq/what-kinds-auxiliary-aids-and-services-are-required-ada-ensure-effective-communication

Accommodation Examples
Source: Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Link: askjan.org/soar/hearing/hearingex.html

Auxiliary Aids and Services for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities
Source: U.S. Department of Education
Link: www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/auxaids.html

Students with Blindness and Low Vision
Source: Blue Ridge Community College
Link: disabilitynavigator.org/program/54962/vision-impaired-blue-ridge-chapter

Airports Getting Friendlier for Blind Travelers
Source: USA Today
Link: www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/2018/03/14/airports-blind-travelers-augmented-reality/422562002/

Audio Description to Allow the Blind to “See” the Total Eclipse
Source: American Council of the Blind (ACB)
Link: www.pathstoliteracy.org/resource/audio-description-allow-blind-see-total-eclipse/

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook: Communication and the ADA
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/publication/disability-law-handbook#Communication and the ADA

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook: Service Animals and the ADA
Source: ADA National Network
Link: https://adata.org/publication/disability-law-handbook#Service Animals and the ADA

Netflix to Enhance Access for Customers Who Are Blind
Source: American Council of the Blind (ACB)
Link: dralegal.org/featured/netflix-enhance-access-customers-blind/

Questions & Answers about Blindness and Vision Impairments in the Workplace and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Link: www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/qa_vision.cfm

Workbook

The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities
Source: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: www.ncwd-youth.info/publications/the-411-on-disability-disclosure-a-workbook-for-youth-with-disabilities/

Websites

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
Search for ADA information by topic or type of disability.
Link: www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/disability.cfm

Job Accommodation Network (JAN)
Search for information on job accommodations.
Link: askjan.org/media/index.htm

American Council of the Blind
Link: www.acb.org

American Foundation for the Blind
Link: http://www.afb.org

National Federation of the Blind
Link: https://nfb.org/

Media

Disability Inclusion Starts with You (Captioned)
Source: Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP)
Link: www.dol.gov/ofccp/SelfIdVideo.html

ADA Live! Podcasts
ADA Live! is a free monthly show broadcast nationally on the Internet. Learn about your rights and responsibilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Leaders in the field will share their knowledge, experience, and successful strategies that increase the participation of persons with disabilities in communities and businesses. Listen to the archived podcasts or read the episode transcripts. Most episodes include a list of useful of Resources. ADA Live! is produced by the Southeast ADA Center, a member of the ADA National Network and a project of the Burton Blatt Institute (BBI) at Syracuse University.
Source:
Southeast ADA National Center
Link: adalive.org

Web Courses

Foundations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Web Course (Southeast ADA Center)

Source: Southeast ADA Center
Link:
bit.ly/foundations-ada-course

The ADA Foundations (bit.ly/foundations-ada-course) is a comprehensive web course designed to increase your knowledge and understanding of the core concepts about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). The web course has been developed to help you learn about the important concepts of the ADA and to think about inclusive solutions for people with disabilities in the workplace, state and local government programs, and private businesses.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this web course, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the ADA using a civil rights framework.
  • Identify the five titles of the ADA.
  • Provide a basic overview of each title of the ADA.
  • Define the general nondiscrimination requirements of the ADA.
  • Explain each nondiscrimination requirement using 1-2 real-life examples.
  • Identify the defenses or limitations of each nondiscrimination requirement.
  • Identify the federal agencies responsible for enforcing each title of the ADA.
  • Locate and use resources for information on the ADA.

 

 

SECTION 5: Presentation

Pre-Module for the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: “For people with vision loss, much of the information in our environments is not available. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with vision loss have the right to equal access to the information and communications in our environments. This is the right to effective communication.”

“For people with vision loss, what are some ways you can think of that provide equal access to information and communications in our environment? Let’s make a list of all the ways we can think of that help people with vision loss to get equal access to the information and communications in our environments, especially when we go out into the community.”

Facilitator Note: Make a list of all responses from the group on a white board, flip chart, etc., and save this list for an activity at the end of this module.

“Today we are going to learn about the Americans with Disabilities Act and effective communication for people with vision loss.”

Facilitator Note: Use Module 10 PowerPoint slides, The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals who are Blind or Low Vision.

 

 

Module 10: The ADA and Effective Communication for Individuals Who are Blind or Low Vision

Slide 1 – Effective Communication for Individuals Who are Blind or Low Vision

Slide 1 Notes – Effective Communication for Individuals Who are Blind or Low Vision

Learning objective: The student will be able to define the terms “effective communication” and “auxiliary aids and services.”

Facilitator Talking Points:

Today we are going to learn about the Effective Communication for Individuals Who are Blind or Low Vision

Slide 2 – What is Effective Communication?

Slide 2 Notes – What is Effective Communication?

Learning objective: The student will be able to define the terms “effective communication” and “auxiliary aids and services.”

Facilitator Talking Points:

We communicate in different ways. Some people speak and read English while others speak and read German or Spanish. Some people need large print material and others read Braille. Whatever language you speak and read, you want to be understood and understand the information that is shared with you. The Americans with Disabilities Act says that people need to be able to effectively communicate their wants and needs. Sometimes, we can get by with someone reading information to us. For example, a server in a restaurant might be able to read the menu to you so you can order your food. However, when things are important, we may choose to read the document. As a person who is blind or has low vision, you may request that a document be provided in an alternate format such as Braille, an audio recording, or an electronic document.

Slide 3 – Providing Effective Communication through Auxiliary Aids and Services

Slide 3 Notes – Providing Effective Communication through Auxiliary Aids and Services

Learning objective: The student will be able to define the terms “effective communication” and “auxiliary aids and services.”

Facilitator Talking Points:

Braille, screen readers, and audio recordings are just a few examples of things that can help us communicate effectively. Any device or service that provides equal access to communication is called an auxiliary aid and service. The word auxiliary means to provide additional help or support.

Slide 4 – Examples of Auxiliary Aids and Services for People Who are Blind or Low Vision

Slide 4 Notes – Examples of Auxiliary Aids and Services for People Who are Blind or Low Vision

Learning objective: The student will identify 3-5 ways they can communicate.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Let’s talk about some of the ways we can communicate effectively. You may already use some of these tools.

  • A qualified reader means someone who can read effectively, accurately, and impartially, using any necessary specialized vocabulary.
  • Notetakers can be used to write out information for review later. Note takers can be very effective in college classes to document course lectures.
  • Screen readers are software programs that allow blind or visually impaired users to read the text that is displayed on the computer screen with a speech synthesizer or braille display. (Source: American Foundation for the Blind – Screen Readers – afb.org/blindness-and-low-vision/using-technology/using-computer/part-ii-experienced-computer-user-new-0)
  • Screen Magnification software enlarges text and graphics on a computer screen. (Source: American Foundation for the Blind – Screen Magnification Systems – afb.org/node/16207/screen-magnification-systems)
  • An optical reader is a device that captures printed material such as forms, newspapers and books, and reads text aloud. Some of them also translate the text into braille. (Source: ADA Title II Action Guide for State and Local Governments – Glossary – adaactionguide.org/glossary#o)
  • Describe visually presented materials)
  • Provide assistance to fill out forms
  • Audio recording of printed information
  • Braille materials and displays
  • Large print materials
  • Materials in accessible electronic format
  • Secondary auditory programs (SAP) is a service carried alongside a television channel as an alternative or augmentation to the audio that accompanies the video portion of a program. Listeners can choose this secondary audio signal through either a television, a stereo VCR equipped to receive SAP signals, or a special SAP receiver. (Source: ADA Title II Action Guide for State and Local Governments – Glossary – adaactionguide.org/glossary#o)
  • Accessible electronic and information technology can be used by people with a wide range of abilities and disabilities. Each user is able to interact with the technology in ways that work best for him or her.
  • Email is a method of exchanging messages between people using electronic devices.
  • Text messages are alphabetic and numeric character messages sent between two or more users of mobile phones, tablets, desk top computers, laptops, or other devices. Text messages may be sent over a cellular network or the Internet.
  • Instant messaging is done in real-time and allows text transmission over the internet.

Slide 5 – ADA and Equal Access to Government Services

Slide 5 Notes – ADA and Equal Access to Government Services

Learning objective: The student will be able to describe how the ADA’s effective communication requirements apply to state and local government.

Facilitator Talking Points:

State and local governments are covered by Title 2 (or section 2) of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA says that state and local government agencies must make sure that all of its programs, activities, and services can be enjoyed and used by all people. This includes you!

For example, you may want to attend a city council meeting. Your city has the responsibility to make sure that you can communicate and fully participate in the meeting. They might provide Braille or large print documents for the meeting.

 

 

Slide 6 – Communicating with Your Government

Slide 6 Notes – Communicating with Your Government

Learning objective: The student will be able to describe how the ADA’s effective communication requirements apply to state and local government.

Facilitator Talking Points:

The most important thing to remember is that your government must make sure that you can participate equally and in a way that you prefer. Your favorite way to communicate should always be the first choice.

 

 

Slide 7 – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Libraries

Slide 7 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Libraries

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify 1 method of effective communication at public libraries.

Facilitator Talking Points:
Libraries are very important to communities. They are places to learn new things, places to study, and places that allow us to follow our interests. Long before anybody ever thought about the ADA, libraries were places of equal access to information. Today, libraries continue to be a place where anybody can go and equally use the library services. Since libraries are a function of local government, they must make sure their buildings, services, and the way they do business is equal for all people. This includes effective communication. Libraries must be accessible for people who are blind by providing signs that are in raised letters and in Braille, large print and audio books, and screen readers and magnification software for computers.

Slide 8– Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Parks and Recreational Facilities

Slide 8 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Parks and Recreational Facilities

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least 1 method of effective communication at parks and recreational facilities.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Everybody enjoys the opportunity to go outside and enjoy a park. Government agencies are required to make sure all people can enjoy parks and recreation programs equally. Parks and recreation staff must be able to communicate with the public in order to provide information on the services and programs offered. They also need to make sure that all people can communicate equally in all park activities and programs

 

 

Slide 9 – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Voting and the Election Process

Slide 9 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Government – Voting and the Election Process

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least 1 method of effective communication when voting.

Facilitator Talking Points:

One of the most important things we can do as citizens is to vote. Voting is how we decide about the laws that we need and who will represent us in government. The ADA ensures that we all have the opportunity to vote by making sure voting locations are accessible, voter registration is fair, voting booths are accessible, and easy to use. Governments must provide qualified readers, ballots in large print and Braille, and audio recordings of information for how to vote. Voting locations must also provide electronic information technology such as screen readers, magnification software and high contrast options for people who are blind or have low vision.

Slide 10 – ADA and Equal Access in Places of Public Accommodation

Slide 10 Notes – ADA and Equal Access in Places of Public Accommodation

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least 2 places of public accommodation that he/she visits on a regular basis in his/her daily activities.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Before the ADA, there were no rules allowing people with disabilities to have equal access to private businesses in the community like people without disabilities. The stores, restaurants, and arenas (known as public accommodations under the ADA) were not accessible to all people. Today, because of Title III (or section 3) of the ADA, businesses must make sure that they can communicate with all customers.

We all enjoy meeting our friends at a restaurant or basketball game. What if you couldn’t read the menu? Restaurant staff should be prepared to read the menu, if necessary. At arenas, people who are blind or have low vision should have access to audio description and/or programs in large print or Braille. You should also be able to buy tickets online for events.

Slide 11 – What is a “Public Accommodation” Required to Provide?

Slide 11 Notes – What is a “Public Accommodation” Required to Provide?

Learning objective: The student will be able to explain public accommodation’s requirement to provide effective communication.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Before the ADA, there were no rules allowing people with disabilities to have equal access to private businesses in the community like non-disabled people. The stores, restaurants, and arenas (known as public accommodations under the ADA) were not accessible to all people. Today, because of Title III (or section 3) of the ADA, businesses must make sure that they can communicate with all customers.

We all enjoy shopping for new clothes or meeting our friends at a restaurant or basketball game. What if you couldn’t communicate with the waiter? Restaurant staff should be prepared to read the menu for you or provide a Braille or large print menu. If you are purchasing tickets for a sporting event on-line, the website should be able to be read by a screen reader and should be fully accessible.

Slide 12 – Examples of Effective Communication in Places of Public Accommodation – Movie Theaters

Slide 12 Notes – Examples of Effective Communication in Places of Public Accommodation – Movie Theaters

Learning objective: The student will be able to identify at least 1 method of effective communication at movie theaters or other entertainment locations.

Facilitator Talking Points:

Movie theaters can be especially challenging for people who are blind or have low vision. For example, theaters that show digital movies are required to have audio description technology and provide a headset for the audio description. Also, theaters must have Braille and raised letter signs.

 

 

Slide 13 – Do I have to pay for Braille, Large Print, Audio Description, or Other Modification?

Slide 13 Notes – Do I have to pay for Braille, Large Print, Audio Description, or Other Modification?

Learning objective: The student will understand their rights under ADA when making a request for effective communication.

Facilitator Talking Points:

We have focused on effective communication and your rights under the ADA when enjoying the benefits of government programs and services and places in the community where we shop, watch movies, or go to the doctor.

You might think “This is great! But do I have to pay for Braille, large print, audio description or other effective communication?” The answer is “no.” Because state and local governments and places of public accommodation are required to provide effective communication, if you need these services they are required to provide one. Also, they cannot make you pay an additional charge. That is a charge the business or government must cover.

Post Module for the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: Using the list from the Pre-Module Activity, ask if the group would like to add to the ways that help people with vision loss to get equal access to the information and communications in our environments.

Use a different color or a similar method to indicate new responses during the Post-Module Activity. Refer to the PPT Slide on “Examples of Auxiliary Aids and Services for People Who Are Blind or Low Vision” to make sure all of these are included in the final list from the group. If you need a prompt, ask something similar to the following:

“Can anyone think of a situation where an e-mail might be useful in providing effective communication for someone with vision loss?”

Once the group agrees that this is a way to provide effective communication and equal access for people with vision loss, add it to the list during this Post-Module Activity.

 

 

SECTION 6: Learning Activities

For the Training Facilitator:

Facilitator Note: Learning activities have been designed to reinforce the content from the PowerPoint presentation. A menu of activities has been provided. You may choose one or more activities based upon the time that you have to present the material and upon the needs of the students. For each interactive activity designed to reinforce the content from the PowerPoint presentation, suggested time frames are included below. Please keep in mind the age of your youth as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group.

Activity #1 Group Discussion

Facilitator Note: Please allow time frames for these discussions and activities that are appropriate for the size of the group and the makeup of the group. Please be flexible if the discussion or the sharing is productive, and the participants are actively engaged.

Activity: “Effective Communication—How Do I Get Equal Access?”

Time: 5 – 15 minutes
Facilitator Script:
“Let’s think of places we might want to go in our community and think of ways that we can get equal access to information and communications at these places in our community.”

“For example, if we go to the public library, what are some things that would help us to get around the library and to participate in all of the programs, services and activities that a library provides?” (Reinforce all responses that identify auxiliary aids and services for people who are blind or low vision. See PPT Slide on Examples of Auxiliary Aids and Services for People Who Are Blind or Low Vision.)

“If we go to a movie theater or a local community theater, what are some things that would help us to get around the theater and help us to enjoy the movie or a live performance?” (Reinforce all responses that identify auxiliary aids and services for people who are blind or low vision. See PPT Slide on Examples of Auxiliary Aids and Services for People Who Are Blind or Low Vision.)

“If we are going to a medical appointment to see a new doctor for the first time, what are some things that would help us to get around in that new environment and help us to provide information and understand all communications from the staff and the doctor?” (Reinforce all responses that identify auxiliary aids and services for people who are blind or low vision. See PPT Slide on Examples of Auxiliary Aids and Services for People Who Are Blind or Low Vision.)

“What are some other places in the community where you would like to go, and what are some things that you would need for effective communication and equal access at that place?”

Activity #2 Art Projects & Musical Expression

Art Projects

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by art activities, such as drawing, painting, collages, murals, etc., you might use art materials to do the following. Please keep in mind the age of your students as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group. If members of your group have difficulty manipulating art materials, such as students who have difficulty using scissors due to limited hand dexterity, consider working in partners or small groups.

If your group is made up of students with varying levels of vision loss, consider having students with low vision work as partners or in small groups with students with total vision loss. Using materials such as magazines, advertising flyers, brochures, pamphlets, etc., have the students with low vision audio describe the pictures and words that the partners or small groups might decide to use in a collage or mural. If your group is made up of students with total vision loss, consider using the Musical Expression activity with your group.

Activity: “What Does Effective Communication Look Like?”

Time: 15 minutes or more
Facilitator Note: Use large pieces of paper and any materials to cut up such as magazines, advertising flyers, brochures, pamphlets, etc., have the students work in pairs or small groups to create a collage using pictures, words, symbols, cartoons, etc.

Facilitator Script: “With your partner (or small group), think of a place in the community where you would like to go. Using any of these materials, create a collage that shows things that you would need to have effective communication and equal access at the place where you would like to go. It might help you to think of all the things you would like to do at the place where you want to go, and then think of what you might need to help you to do those things. When I call time, we will get back together to share our collages and share our ideas of what effective communication looks like for us.”

Facilitator Note: After each pair or small group shares a collage, ask the group if there are any other ideas of what might be needed for effective communication and equal access at that place in the community.

Musical Expression

Facilitator Note: If your group is engaged by musical expression, you might want to use activities such as singing, simple musical instruments, percussion instruments, drumming, etc. The activity of drumming can be done using plastic buckets or containers, or using hands on tabletops. Please keep in mind the age of your students as well as the individual skill levels and specific disabilities to allow time frames that are appropriate for your group.

Activity: “Where Will I Go & What Will I Need?”

Time: 15 minutes or more
Facilitator Note: This musical expression activity follows a “Call and Response” format. Using any object as the “Musical Wand,” each person in the circle or group can only “perform” when that person has possession of the Musical Wand.

The first person who is given the Musical Wand has to call out in song a place to go in the community in the following format:

  • “I want to go to the City Museum.
    What will I need at the City Museum?”

Then the Musical Wand is immediately passed to anyone else in the group, and the person who receives the Musical Wand has to sing out one thing that would provide effective communication and equal access at that place using the following format:

  • “When I get to the City Museum,
    I need a Tactile Map at the City Museum.”

The members of the group continue to pass the Musical Wand around as long as someone has a response to add that names a new way to provide effective communication and equal access at that place.

Then the activity starts all over, and another person is given the Musical Wand and has to call out in song a place to go in the community in the same format as above.

Facilitator Note: If your group needs prompts for places to go in the community, you might use any of the following as the “Call” for prompting responses from your group:

  • “I want to go to my favorite restaurant.
    What will I need at my favorite restaurant?”
  • “I want to go to the movie theater.
    What will I need at the movie theater?”
  • “I want to go to the City Park.
    What will I need at the City Park?”
  • “I want to go on the city bus.
    What will I need on the city bus?”
  • “I want to go to the polls to vote.
    What will I need at the polls to vote?”
  • “I want to go to the city library.
    What will I need at the city library?”

Think about places in your community that the members of your group might be familiar with and include those places in this activity.

Activity #3 Dramatic Arts

Facilitator Note: If your group is especially engaged by dramatic arts, such as role plays, skits, improvisation, etc., you might use dramatic arts activities.

Activity: “Effective Communication—Let Me Be Clear!”

Time: 15 minutes or more
Facilitator Note: Using partners or small groups, have each pair or each small group create a skit about effective communication and equal access at a specific place in the community, and act out the skit in front of the group. Write places in the community such as the list below on small index cards, and give one place in the community to each pair or small group. Following each dramatic arts performance, ask for feedback from the group about the auxiliary aids and services shown in the skit. Ask the group if they have any suggestions for the situation shown in the skit.

Possible Places in the Community to write on Index Cards:

  • Retail Stores
  • Movie Theaters
  • Sports Arenas
  • Restaurants
  • Doctor’s Office
  • Local Bank
  • Polling Places for Voting
  • Yoga Class at Parks & Recreation Center
  • Nature Walk in City Park
  • Public Library
  • City Museum
  • City Council Meeting at City Hall

Facilitator Note: If you know some favorite places your group likes to go in the community, consider including these on the index cards for use in creating skits about effective communication and equal access for people with vision loss.

Activity #4 Role Models

Facilitator Note: For young people with disabilities, it is very important to identify with role models who are people with disabilities living independently in the community. Sources for finding role models that may serve as guest speakers in class include:

Activity 4A: “And Now, A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5–15 minutes
Facilitator Note
: Invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 – 4 people with vision loss to briefly share about a time when each one had to advocate for their rights to effective communication under the ADA. Then allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

Activity 4B: Virtual Reality—”A Word from the Real World”

Time: 5 – 15 minutes

Facilitator Note: Using Zoom or a similar platform, invite a speaker or a small panel of 2 to 4 people with vision loss to briefly share about a time when each one had to advocate for their rights to effective communication under the ADA. Then allow time for the group to ask questions and dialogue with the role model(s).

SECTION 7: Handouts or Materials Needed

  • Audiovisual equipment for PowerPoint presentation and/or videos.
  • Art materials, blank paper, colored pencils or markers, rubber ball, and a bottle of liquid bubbles (Activity 1).
  • Photocopies of PowerPoint slides, including alternate formats such as large print, Braille, and electronic formats, such as a USB drive for students with visual or print disabilities.

SECTION 8: After Class

Homework Possibilities

Interview someone at home, your school, in your neighborhood or in the community. Ask one or more of the following questions:

  • Can you tell me about a time or situation when you had to request an accommodation or ask for help in a public place?
  • Can you tell me how you asked for help when you need it?
  • Can you tell me about a time when you had to know about your legal rights?

During the next session, we will share these interviews with the group.

Facilitator Note: You may wish to identify several people in the community who would be willing to assist with this homework assignment. Refer to Section 9 – Community Organizations for possible contacts. Students may also want to interview someone they know such as a family member or friend. The contacts for the exercise may be people with and without disabilities.

Quiz Questions

Use these quiz questions to reinforce learning by giving this pop quiz at the end of class, as a homework assignment, or at the beginning of the next class session. Correct answers are noted with an asterisk (*).

  1. Braille is not a form of effective communication.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. Auxiliary aides are devices and services that help us to effectively communicate.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Audio recording of written material is an example of an auxiliary aid.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Local governments must communicate with you in a way you prefer.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. If my preferred communication style is not available then my government does not have to come up with another auxiliary aid.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. Governments must make sure you can communicate in your preferred way when you vote in elections.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Waiters at a restaurant do not have to read a menu to you when ordering.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. If you need an auxiliary aid like Braille or large print you will have to pay for it.
  • Yes
  • No*
  1. Sports stadiums are a “place of public accommodation”.
  • Yes*
  • No
  1. Parks must have Braille or tactile signs.
  • Yes*
  • No

SECTION 9: Resources for Students

Additional Reading and Videos

Fact Sheet: An Overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/factsheet/ADA-overview

Video – Overview of the ADA
Source: ADA National Network and New England ADA Center
Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ns7UY8HdPr8 (6:41 minutes)

Video: ADA Signing Ceremony (22 minutes)
Source: U.S. Department of Justice
Link: www.ada.gov/videogallery.htm#ADAsigning990 (22 minutes)

The ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook
Source: ADA National Network
Link: adata.org/publication/disability-law-handbook

Audio Description Demonstrations
Source: YouTube
Link: www.youtube.com/watch?v=jT5AsjzgIC4

All About Audio Description
Source: American Council of the Blind
Link: www.acb.org/adp/ad.html#what

Alternate Format Resources

Free Library Materials
Source: National Library Service
Link: nlsbard.loc.gov/login//NLS

Free Braille Books
Source: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
Link: www.aph.org/dolly-partons-imagination-library/apply/

Free Audio Books
Source: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
Link: https://www.aph.org/imagination-library-collaboration/

Apps

Be My Eyes
Link: itunes.apple.com/ca/app/be-my-eyes-helping-blind-see/id905177575

Talking Calculator
Link: itunes.apple.com/us/app/talking-calculator/id424464284

TapTapSee
Link: itunes.apple.com/us/app/taptapsee-blind-visually-impaired/id567635020

Microsoft Soundscape
Link: www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/product/soundscape/

Americans with Disabilities Act Information Center

ADA National Network

Phone: 1-800-949-4232 (toll free)

Website: adata.org

Facebook: facebook.com/adanetwork

Twitter: twitter.com/ADANational

National Resources

Community Organizations

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